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Interactions between Ambient Air Particles and Greenness on Cause-specific Mortality in Seven Korean Metropolitan Cities, 2008–2016

by 1, 1 and 1,2,*
1
BK21PLUS Program in ‘Embodiment: Health-Society Interaction’, Department of Public Health Science, Graduate School, Korea University, Seoul 02841, Korea
2
School of Health Policy and Management, College of Health Science, Korea University, Seoul 02841, Korea
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(10), 1866; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16101866
Received: 10 April 2019 / Revised: 24 May 2019 / Accepted: 25 May 2019 / Published: 27 May 2019
This study aims to investigate the association of particulate matter with an aerodynamic diameter smaller than 10 μm (PM10) and greenness with cause-specific mortality and their interactions in seven Korean metropolitan cities. We obtained the annual standardized cause-specific mortality rates, annual mean concentration of PM10, and annual Normalized Difference Vegetation Index (NDVI) for 73 districts for the period 2008–2016. We used negative binomial regression with city-specific random effects to estimate the association of PM10 and greenness with mortality. The models were adjusted for potential confounders and spatial autocorrelation. We also conducted stratified analyses to investigate whether the association between PM10 and mortality differs by the level of greenness. Our findings suggest an increased risk of all causes examined, except respiratory disease mortality, with high levels of PM10 and decreased risk of cardiovascular-related mortality with a high level of greenness. In the stratified analyses, we found interactions between PM10 and greenness, but these interactions in the opposite direction depend on the cause of death. The effects of PM10 on cardiovascular-related mortality were attenuated in greener areas, whereas the effects of PM10 on non-accidental mortality were attenuated in less green areas. Further studies are needed to explore the underlying mechanisms. View Full-Text
Keywords: air pollution; particulate matter; greenness; Normalized Difference Vegetation Index; mortality; urban environment air pollution; particulate matter; greenness; Normalized Difference Vegetation Index; mortality; urban environment
MDPI and ACS Style

Kim, S.; Kim, H.; Lee, J.-T. Interactions between Ambient Air Particles and Greenness on Cause-specific Mortality in Seven Korean Metropolitan Cities, 2008–2016. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 1866. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16101866

AMA Style

Kim S, Kim H, Lee J-T. Interactions between Ambient Air Particles and Greenness on Cause-specific Mortality in Seven Korean Metropolitan Cities, 2008–2016. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2019; 16(10):1866. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16101866

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kim, Sera, Honghyok Kim, and Jong-Tae Lee. 2019. "Interactions between Ambient Air Particles and Greenness on Cause-specific Mortality in Seven Korean Metropolitan Cities, 2008–2016" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 16, no. 10: 1866. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16101866

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