Next Article in Journal
Relationship of Anxiety and Depression with Respiratory Symptoms: Comparison between Depressed and Non-Depressed Smokers in Singapore
Next Article in Special Issue
Investigating Spatial Autocorrelation and Spillover Effects in Freeway Crash-Frequency Data
Previous Article in Journal
Does a Good Firm Breed Good Organizational Citizens? The Moderating Role of Perspective Taking
Article Menu
Issue 1 (January-1) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessArticle
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16(1), 162; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph16010162

Investigation of the Contributory Factors to the Guessability of Traffic Signs

1
School of Mechanical and Electrical Engineering, Anhui Jianzhu University, Hefei 230601, China
2
School of Civil Engineering and Transportation, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640, China
3
School of Automobile and Traffic Engineering, Hefei University of Technology, Hefei 230009, China
4
Department of Civil Environmental Engineering, The Hong Kong Polytechnic University, Hong Kong, China
5
Highway Safety Research Center, University of North Carolina, 730 Martin Luther King Jr Blvd, Suite 300, Chapel Hill, NC 27599-3430, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 16 November 2018 / Revised: 29 December 2018 / Accepted: 2 January 2019 / Published: 8 January 2019
Full-Text   |   PDF [34113 KB, uploaded 9 January 2019]   |  

Abstract

Traffic signs play an important role in traffic management systems. A variety of studies have focused on drivers’ comprehension of traffic signs. However, the travel safety of prospective users, which has been rarely mentioned in previous studies, has attracted considerable attention from relevant departments in China. With the growth of international and interregional travel demand, traffic signs should be designed more universally to reduce the potential risks to drivers. To identify key factors that improve prospective users’ sign comprehension, this study investigated eight factors that may affect users’ performance regarding sign guessing. Two hundred and one Chinese students, all of whom intended to be drivers and none of whom had experience with daily driving after obtaining a license or visits to Germany, guessed the meanings and rated the sign features of 54 signs. We investigated the effects of selected user factors on their sign guessing performance. Additionally, the contributions of four cognitive design features to the guessability of traffic signs were examined. Based on an analysis of the relationships between the cognitive features and the guessability score of signs, the contributions of four sign features to the guessability of traffic signs were examined. Moreover, by exploring Chinese users’ differences in guessing performance between Chinese signs and German signs, cultural issues in sign design were identified. The results showed that vehicle ownership and attention to traffic signs exerted a significant influence on guessing performance. As expected, driver’s license training and the number of years in college were dominant factors for guessing performance. With regard to design features, semantic distance and confidence in guessing were two dominant factors for the guessability of signs. We suggest improving the design of signs by including vivid, universal symbols. Thus, we provide several suggestions for designing more user-friendly signs. View Full-Text
Keywords: prospective user factors; guessability; contributory factors; semantic distance; confidence in guessing; design of signs prospective user factors; guessability; contributory factors; semantic distance; confidence in guessing; design of signs
Figures

Figure 1

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Liu, J.; Wen, H.; Zhu, D.; Kumfer, W. Investigation of the Contributory Factors to the Guessability of Traffic Signs. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2019, 16, 162.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health EISSN 1660-4601 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top