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Article

The Short Term Musculoskeletal and Cognitive Effects of Prolonged Sitting During Office Computer Work

1
School of Physiotherapy and Exercise Science, Faculty of Health Science, Curtin University, Perth 6102, Australia
2
Department of Public and Occupational Health, Amsterdam Public Health Research Institute, VU University Medical Center, 1081 Amsterdam, The Netherlands
3
Department of Health, Human Performance and Recreation, University of Arkansas, Fayetteville, AR 72701, USA
4
School of Aviation, Faculty of Science, University of New South Wales, Sydney 2052, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(8), 1678; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15081678
Received: 14 July 2018 / Revised: 1 August 2018 / Accepted: 2 August 2018 / Published: 7 August 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Occupational Sedentary Behaviour)
Office workers are exposed to high levels of sedentary time. In addition to cardio-vascular and metabolic health risks, this sedentary time may have musculoskeletal and/or cognitive impacts on office workers. Participants (n = 20) undertook two hours of laboratory-based sitting computer work to investigate changes in discomfort and cognitive function (sustained attention and problem solving), along with muscle fatigue, movement and mental state. Over time, discomfort increased in all body areas (total body IRR [95% confidence interval]: 1.43 [1.33–1.53]) reaching clinically meaningful levels in the low back and hip/thigh/buttock areas. Creative problem solving errors increased (β = 0.25 [0.03–1.47]) while sustained attention did not change. There was no change in erector spinae, trapezius, rectus femoris, biceps femoris and external oblique median frequency or amplitude; low back angle changed towards less lordosis, pelvis movement increased, and mental state deteriorated. There were no substantial correlations between discomfort and cognitive function. The observed changes suggest prolonged sitting may have consequences for musculoskeletal discomfort and cognitive function and breaks to interrupt prolonged sitting are recommended. View Full-Text
Keywords: human-computer interaction; musculoskeletal disorders; biomechanics; mental work capacity; office ergonomics human-computer interaction; musculoskeletal disorders; biomechanics; mental work capacity; office ergonomics
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MDPI and ACS Style

Baker, R.; Coenen, P.; Howie, E.; Williamson, A.; Straker, L. The Short Term Musculoskeletal and Cognitive Effects of Prolonged Sitting During Office Computer Work. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1678. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15081678

AMA Style

Baker R, Coenen P, Howie E, Williamson A, Straker L. The Short Term Musculoskeletal and Cognitive Effects of Prolonged Sitting During Office Computer Work. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2018; 15(8):1678. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15081678

Chicago/Turabian Style

Baker, Richelle, Pieter Coenen, Erin Howie, Ann Williamson, and Leon Straker. 2018. "The Short Term Musculoskeletal and Cognitive Effects of Prolonged Sitting During Office Computer Work" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 15, no. 8: 1678. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15081678

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