Next Article in Journal
Nurses’ Attitudes toward, and Needs for Online Learning: Differences between Rural and Urban Hospitals in Shanghai, East China
Previous Article in Journal
Oral Symptoms and Oral Health-Related Quality of Life in People with Rare Diseases in Germany: A Cross-Sectional Study
Open AccessArticle

Prenatal Exposure to Aluminum and Status of Selected Essential Trace Elements in Rural South African Women at Delivery

1
School of Health Systems and Public Health, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Pretoria, Private Bag X323, Pretoria 0001, South Africa
2
Environment and Health Research Unit, Medical Research Council, Johannesburg, 2193, South Africa
3
Lancet Laboratories, Department of Analytical Chemistry, Johannesburg 2092, South Africa
4
Department of Biomedical Technology, School of Health Sciences, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg 2094, South Africa
5
Institute of Community Medicine, University of Tromsø, Tromsø 9019, Norway
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(7), 1494; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071494
Received: 11 June 2018 / Revised: 1 July 2018 / Accepted: 12 July 2018 / Published: 15 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Health)
This study sought to evaluate the in utero exposure to aluminum and status of selected trace elements in South African women at delivery since aluminum is known to be toxic in all developmental stages even at low concentrations. Serum aluminum was negatively correlated with aluminum in urine, both uncorrected and corrected for creatinine, which suggests the retention of aluminum in body stores. Serum copper and zinc levels were found to be high in this study population. Serum copper levels were negatively correlated with aluminum in serum (β = −0.095; p = 0.05). There was a marginal negative correlation between aluminum levels in serum and manganese levels in whole blood (β = −0.087; p = 0.08). Copper levels in maternal serum were negatively correlated with birth weight and the length of neonates. There were a number of positive correlations between maternal characteristics and birth outcomes. Mothers who consumed root vegetables frequently appeared to be protected from aluminum retention and increased body burden since their serum aluminum levels were found to be significantly lower. The findings of the current study can be used as a baseline for further research on aluminum exposure and its associated interactions and outcomes in vulnerable populations. View Full-Text
Keywords: aluminum; maternal serum and urine; essential trace elements; in utero exposure; birth outcomes aluminum; maternal serum and urine; essential trace elements; in utero exposure; birth outcomes
MDPI and ACS Style

Röllin, H.B.; Nogueira, C.; Olutola, B.; Channa, K.; Odland, J.Ø. Prenatal Exposure to Aluminum and Status of Selected Essential Trace Elements in Rural South African Women at Delivery. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1494.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop