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Climate Change Impacts on Disaster and Emergency Medicine Focusing on Mitigation Disruptive Effects: an International Perspective

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Emergency Department and EMS, University Hospital of Bichat, Paris 75018, France
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Ilumens Simulation Center, University of Paris-Diderot, Paris 75018, France
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Acute Care Division & Emergency Department, Grand Hôpital de Charleroi, Charleroi 6040, Belgium
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Faculty of Public Health & Medicine, Catholic University of Louvain, Brussels 1348, Belgium
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Emergency Department, University Hospital of Geneva, Geneva 44041, Switzerland
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University of Geneva Medical School, Geneva 1205, Switzerland
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Unit for Research in Emergency and Disaster, Department of Medicine, University of Oviedo, Oviedo 33006, Spain
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University of Paris Diderot, Sorbonne Paris Cité, EA 7334 Recherche clinique coordonnée ville-hôpital, Méthodologies et Société (REMES), Paris 75018, France
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Study Group for Efficiency and Quality of Emergency Departments and Non-Scheduled Activities Departments, Paris 75018, France
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(7), 1379; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15071379
Received: 5 May 2018 / Revised: 11 June 2018 / Accepted: 25 June 2018 / Published: 1 July 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change and Health: An Interdisciplinary Perspective)
In recent decades, climate change has been responsible for an increase in the average temperature of the troposphere and of the oceans, with consequences on the frequency and intensity of many extreme weather phenomena. Climate change’s effects on natural disasters can be expected to induce a rise in humanitarian crises. In addition, it will surely impact the population’s long-term general health, especially among the most fragile. There are foreseeable health risks that both ambulatory care organizations and hospitals will face as global temperatures rise. These risks include the geographic redistribution of infectious (particularly zoonotic) diseases, an increase in cardiac and respiratory illnesses, as well as a host of other health hazards. Some of these risks have been detailed for most developed countries as well as for some developing countries. Using these existing risk assessments as a template, organizational innovations as well as implementation strategies should be proposed to mitigate the disruptive effects of these health risks on emergency departments and by extension, reduce the negative impact of climate change on the populations they serve. View Full-Text
Keywords: climate change; emergency medicine; health; disaster preparedness; management; European perspective climate change; emergency medicine; health; disaster preparedness; management; European perspective
MDPI and ACS Style

Ghazali, D.A.; Guericolas, M.; Thys, F.; Sarasin, F.; Arcos González, P.; Casalino, E. Climate Change Impacts on Disaster and Emergency Medicine Focusing on Mitigation Disruptive Effects: an International Perspective. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 1379.

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