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Open AccessArticle

Water-Based Automobile Paints Potentially Reduce the Exposure of Refinish Painters to Toxic Metals

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Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, National Kaohsiung University of Science and Technology, Kaohsiun 824, Taiwan
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Institute of Labor, Occupational Safety and Health, Ministry of Labor, New Taipei City 221, Taiwan
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Graduate Master Program in Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliu 640, Taiwan
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Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, Hungkuang University of Science and Technology, Shalu 433, Taiwan
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Department of Safety, Health and Environmental Engineering, National Yunlin University of Science and Technology, Douliu 640, Taiwan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(5), 899; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15050899
Received: 31 March 2018 / Revised: 27 April 2018 / Accepted: 28 April 2018 / Published: 3 May 2018
Exposure to lead-containing dusts is a global public health concern. This work addresses an important issue of whether eco-friendly water-based paints reduce the exposure potential of auto-repainting workers to metals. With this aim, metal levels in automobile paints and worker metal exposure were measured using both solvent- and water-based paints. The levels of metals, and particularly Pb, Cr (total), Fe, and Cu, in solvent-based paints varied greatly among colors and brands. Lead concentrations ranged from below the detection limit (~0.25 μg/g) to 107,928 μg/g (dry film) across all samples. In water-based paints, the concentrations of Pb and Cr (total) were generally two to three orders of magnitude lower, but the concentrations of Al and Cu exceeded those in some solvent-based paints. The personal short-term exposure of workers who applied water-based paints of popular colors, such as black and white, were generally low, with Pb levels of less than <4 µg/m3 and Cr (total) levels of less than 1 µg/m3. Conversely, mean short-term exposure to Pb during the painting of a yellow cab using solvent-based paints were 2028 µg/m3, which was ~14 times the Taiwan short-term permissible exposure limit, while the mean level of exposure to Cr (total) was 290 µg/m3, which was well below the exposure limit. This study demonstrates that water-based paints reduce the exposure potential to lead, and highlights the importance of source control in limiting the toxic metals in paints. View Full-Text
Keywords: paints; spray painting; toxic metals; lead; exposure assessment paints; spray painting; toxic metals; lead; exposure assessment
MDPI and ACS Style

Hsu, D.-J.; Chung, S.-H.; Dong, J.-F.; Shih, H.-C.; Chang, H.-B.; Chien, Y.-C. Water-Based Automobile Paints Potentially Reduce the Exposure of Refinish Painters to Toxic Metals. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 899. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15050899

AMA Style

Hsu D-J, Chung S-H, Dong J-F, Shih H-C, Chang H-B, Chien Y-C. Water-Based Automobile Paints Potentially Reduce the Exposure of Refinish Painters to Toxic Metals. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2018; 15(5):899. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15050899

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hsu, Der-Jen; Chung, Shun-Hui; Dong, Jie-Feng; Shih, Hui-Chung; Chang, Hong-Bin; Chien, Yeh-Chung. 2018. "Water-Based Automobile Paints Potentially Reduce the Exposure of Refinish Painters to Toxic Metals" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 15, no. 5: 899. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15050899

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