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Open AccessCommunication

The Effect of PM2.5 from Household Combustion on Life Expectancy in Sub-Saharan Africa

1
School of Economics and Management, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074, China
2
Department of Pathophysiology, School of Basic Medicine, Key Laboratory of Education Ministry of China for Neurological Disorders, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430030, China
3
Key Laboratory of Tectonics and Petroleum Resources of Ministry of Education, China University of Geosciences, Wuhan 430074, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(4), 748; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040748
Received: 11 March 2018 / Revised: 4 April 2018 / Accepted: 10 April 2018 / Published: 13 April 2018
Household fuel combustion, especially using solid combustibles (biomass and fossil fuels), for cooking and other activities produces emissions that contribute to concentrations of indoor as well as outdoor air pollutants such as particulate matter with diameter smaller than 2.5 μm (PM2.5) that deteriorate health and likely affect life expectancy (LEX). This study investigates the impact of PM2.5 from household combustion on LEX considering several covariates while controlling for ambient PM2.5 generated by other sectors. The generalized method of moments (GMM) model and the panel cointegration model were applied to a dataset of 43 Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) countries over the time period of 1995–2010. Both approaches provide similar results indicating that household PM2.5 is significantly and negatively associated with higher aggregate LEX in the long-run, and, to a greater degree for female’s. Also, among the control variables, PM2.5 from the transport sector has a greater influence on male’s LEX. Thus, efforts should be combined to reduce household PM2.5 since lower levels are associated with increased LEX. View Full-Text
Keywords: household combustion; PM2.5; life expectancy (LEX); biomass fuel; solid fuel; general method of moments (GMM); panel cointegration; Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA) household combustion; PM2.5; life expectancy (LEX); biomass fuel; solid fuel; general method of moments (GMM); panel cointegration; Sub-Saharan Africa (SSA)
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Aboubacar, B.; Deyi, X.; Abdoul Razak, M.Y.; Hamidou Leyla, B. The Effect of PM2.5 from Household Combustion on Life Expectancy in Sub-Saharan Africa. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 748.

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