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Open AccessArticle

The Political Economy of Health Co-Benefits: Embedding Health in the Climate Change Agenda

1
Australian-German Climate and Energy College, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010, Australia
2
School of Earth Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010, Australia
3
The Nossal Institute for Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010, Australia
4
National Centre for Epidemiology and Population Health, Australian National University, Canberra 0200, Australia
5
Melbourne Sustainable Society Institute, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne 3010, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(4), 674; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040674
Received: 31 January 2018 / Revised: 14 March 2018 / Accepted: 29 March 2018 / Published: 4 April 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change and Health: An Interdisciplinary Perspective)
A complex, whole-of-economy issue such as climate change demands an interdisciplinary, multi-sectoral response. However, evidence suggests that human health has remained elusive in its influence on the development of ambitious climate change mitigation policies for many national governments, despite a recognition that the combustion of fossil fuels results in pervasive short- and long-term health consequences. We use insights from literature on the political economy of health and climate change, the science–policy interface and power in policy-making, to identify additional barriers to the meaningful incorporation of health co-benefits into climate change mitigation policy development. Specifically, we identify four key interrelated areas where barriers may exist in relation to health co-benefits: discourse, efficiency, vested interests and structural challenges. With these insights in mind, we argue that the current politico-economic paradigm in which climate change is situated and the processes used to develop climate change mitigation policies do not adequately support accounting for health co-benefits. We present approaches for enhancing the role of health co-benefits in the development of climate change mitigation policies to ensure that health is embedded in the broader climate change agenda. View Full-Text
Keywords: health; co-benefits; climate change; political economy health; co-benefits; climate change; political economy
MDPI and ACS Style

Workman, A.; Blashki, G.; Bowen, K.J.; Karoly, D.J.; Wiseman, J. The Political Economy of Health Co-Benefits: Embedding Health in the Climate Change Agenda. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 674.

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