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Article

Beliefs about Vaccinations: Comparing a Sample from a Medical School to That from the General Population

1
Graduate School of Education, Fordham University, New York, NY 10023, USA
2
Institutional Effectiveness and Technology, Oakland University William Beaumont School of Medicine, Rochester, MI 48309-4482, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(4), 620; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040620
Received: 17 January 2018 / Revised: 13 March 2018 / Accepted: 20 March 2018 / Published: 28 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Vaccination and Health Outcomes)
The current study compares health care professionals’ beliefs about vaccination statements with the beliefs of a sample of individuals from the general population. Students and faculty within a medical school (n = 58) and a sample from the general population in the United States (n = 177) were surveyed regarding their beliefs about vaccinations. Participants evaluated statements about vaccinations (both supporting and opposing), and indicated whether they thought the general population would agree with them. Overall, it was found that subjects in both populations agreed with statements supporting vaccination over opposing statements, but the general population was more likely to categorize the supporting statements as beliefs rather than facts. Additionally, there was little consensus within each population as to which statements were considered facts versus beliefs. Both groups underestimated the number of people that would agree with them; however, the medical affiliates showed the effect significantly more. Implications for medical education and health communication are discussed. View Full-Text
Keywords: expert knowledge; illusion of uniqueness; communication; vaccinations; consensus bias; medical affiliates expert knowledge; illusion of uniqueness; communication; vaccinations; consensus bias; medical affiliates
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MDPI and ACS Style

Latella, L.E.; McAuley, R.J.; Rabinowitz, M. Beliefs about Vaccinations: Comparing a Sample from a Medical School to That from the General Population. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 620. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040620

AMA Style

Latella LE, McAuley RJ, Rabinowitz M. Beliefs about Vaccinations: Comparing a Sample from a Medical School to That from the General Population. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2018; 15(4):620. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040620

Chicago/Turabian Style

Latella, Lauren E.; McAuley, Robert J.; Rabinowitz, Mitchell. 2018. "Beliefs about Vaccinations: Comparing a Sample from a Medical School to That from the General Population" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 15, no. 4: 620. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040620

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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