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Microplastic Contamination of Wild and Captive Flathead Grey Mullet (Mugil cephalus)

1
Department of Social Sciences, The Education University of Hong Kong, Tai Po, New Territories, Hong Kong, China
2
Department of Science and Environmental Studies, The Education University of Hong Kong, Tai Po, New Territories, Hong Kong, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(4), 597; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040597
Received: 2 February 2018 / Revised: 20 March 2018 / Accepted: 23 March 2018 / Published: 26 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Microplastics: Hazards to Environmental and Human Health)
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Abstract

A total of 60 flathead grey mullets were examined for microplastic ingestion. Thirty wild mullets were captured from the eastern coast of Hong Kong and 30 captive mullets were obtained from fish farms. Microplastic ingestion was detected in 60% of the wild mullets, with an average of 4.3 plastic items per mullet, while only 16.7% of captive mullets were found to have ingested microplastics, with an average of 0.2 items per mullet. The results suggested that wild mullets have a higher risk of microplastic ingestion than their captive counterparts. The most common plastic items were fibres that were green in colour and small in size (<2 mm). Polypropylene was the most common polymer (42%), followed by polyethylene (25%). In addition, the abundance of microplastics was positively correlated with larger body size among the mullets. View Full-Text
Keywords: microplastic; ingestion; captive mullets; wild mullets; marine pollution microplastic; ingestion; captive mullets; wild mullets; marine pollution
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Cheung, L.T.O.; Lui, C.Y.; Fok, L. Microplastic Contamination of Wild and Captive Flathead Grey Mullet (Mugil cephalus). Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 597.

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