Next Article in Journal
Roma Housing and Eating in 1775 and 2013: A Comparison
Next Article in Special Issue
Domain-Specific Adult Sedentary Behaviour Questionnaire (ASBQ) and the GPAQ Single-Item Question: A Reliability and Validity Study in an Asian Population
Previous Article in Journal
Influence of Algae Age and Population on the Response to TiO2 Nanoparticles
Open AccessBrief Report

Sedentary Behaviour and Hair Cortisol Amongst Women Living in Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Neighbourhoods: A Cross-Sectional Study

1
Institute for Physical Activity and Nutrition (IPAN), School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, Geelong 3220, Australia
2
Department of Community Health Sciences, Cumming School of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary T2N 4Z6, AB, Canada
3
School of Exercise and Nutrition Sciences, Deakin University, 221 Burwood Hwy, Burwood, VIC, 3125, Australia
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(4), 586; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040586
Received: 14 February 2018 / Revised: 22 March 2018 / Accepted: 22 March 2018 / Published: 25 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Sedentary Behaviour and Health)
Women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods are at heightened risk of experiencing psychological stress. Therefore, identifying potential risk factors for stress is important to support positive mental health. A growing body of research has linked sedentary behaviour with mental ill-health (e.g., depression and anxiety); however, little research has specifically investigated potential linkages between sedentary behaviour and stress. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the association between common types of sedentary behaviour and objectively-measured stress (as measured by hair cortisol levels) amongst women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods. During 2012–2013, 72 women (aged 18–46 years) living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods self-reported sedentary behaviour (TV viewing, computer use, overall sitting time) and provided hair samples. Hair cortisol levels were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Linear regression models examined cross-sectional associations between sedentary behaviour and hair cortisol levels. There was no association between any type of sedentary behaviour (TV viewing, computer use, or overall sitting time) and hair cortisol levels in either crude or adjusted models. Sedentary behaviour may not be linked to hair cortisol level (stress) in women living in socioeconomically disadvantaged neighbourhoods. Further studies utilising objective measures of both sedentary behaviour and stress are required to confirm these findings. View Full-Text
Keywords: sitting; screen-time; psychological stress; socioeconomic disadvantage sitting; screen-time; psychological stress; socioeconomic disadvantage
MDPI and ACS Style

Teychenne, M.; Olstad, D.L.; Turner, A.I.; Costigan, S.A.; Ball, K. Sedentary Behaviour and Hair Cortisol Amongst Women Living in Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Neighbourhoods: A Cross-Sectional Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 586. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040586

AMA Style

Teychenne M, Olstad DL, Turner AI, Costigan SA, Ball K. Sedentary Behaviour and Hair Cortisol Amongst Women Living in Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Neighbourhoods: A Cross-Sectional Study. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2018; 15(4):586. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040586

Chicago/Turabian Style

Teychenne, Megan; Olstad, Dana Lee; Turner, Anne I.; Costigan, Sarah A.; Ball, Kylie. 2018. "Sedentary Behaviour and Hair Cortisol Amongst Women Living in Socioeconomically Disadvantaged Neighbourhoods: A Cross-Sectional Study" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 15, no. 4: 586. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15040586

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop