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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(3), 506; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15030506

Acute Stress and Anxiety in Medical Residents on the Emergency Department Duty

1
Faculty of Education, Universidad Internacional de la Rioja, 26006 Logroño, Spain
2
Department of Preventive Medicine, Central Hospital of Asturias, 33006 Oviedo, Spain
3
Department of Biochemistry, Molecular Biology and Immunology 3, University of Granada, 18016 Granada, Spain
4
Institute of Neuroscience “Federico Olóriz”, University of Granada, 18012 Granada, Spain
5
Emergency Department, Virgen de las Nieves University Hospital, 18014 Granada, Spain
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 15 February 2018 / Revised: 6 March 2018 / Accepted: 6 March 2018 / Published: 13 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Health Behavior, Chronic Disease and Health Promotion)
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Abstract

The objectives of this longitudinal study were to compare salivary cortisol release patterns in medical residents and their self-perceived anxiety levels between a regular working day and a day when on call in the emergency department (ED-duty day) and to determine any differences in cortisol release pattern as a function of years of residency or sex. The study included 35 residents (physicians-in-training) of the Granada University Hospital, Granada, Spain. Acute stress was measured on a regular working day and an ED-duty day, evaluating anxiety-state with the Spanish version of the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory. Physiological stress assessment was based on salivary cortisol levels. Cortisol release concentrations were higher on an ED-duty day than on a regular working day, with a significantly increased area under the curve (AUC) (p < 0.006). This difference slightly attenuated with longer residency experience. No gender difference in anxiety levels was observed (p < 0.001). According to these findings, the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis activity and anxiety levels of medical residents are higher on an ED-duty day than on a regular working day. View Full-Text
Keywords: acute stress; cortisol; medical resident; Emergency Department-duty day; anxiety acute stress; cortisol; medical resident; Emergency Department-duty day; anxiety
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This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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González-Cabrera, J.M.; Fernández-Prada, M.; Iribar, C.; Molina-Ruano, R.; Salinero-Bachiller, M.; Peinado, J.M. Acute Stress and Anxiety in Medical Residents on the Emergency Department Duty. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 506.

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