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Open AccessArticle

“I Was Relieved to Know That My Baby Was Safe”: Women’s Attitudes and Perceptions on Using a New Electronic Fetal Heart Rate Monitor during Labor in Tanzania

1
Institute of Health and Society, Faculty of Medicine, University of Oslo, Forskningsveien 3A, 0373 Oslo, Norway
2
Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Care, University of Stavanger, 4036 Stavanger, Norway
3
Temeke Regional Referral Hospital, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
4
Ministry of Health Community Development Gender Elderly and Children, Dodoma, Tanzania
5
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Aga Khan University, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(2), 302; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15020302
Received: 15 December 2017 / Revised: 5 February 2018 / Accepted: 7 February 2018 / Published: 9 February 2018
To increase labor monitoring and prevent neonatal morbidity and mortality, a new wireless, strap-on electronic fetal heart rate monitor called Moyo was introduced in Tanzania in 2016. As part of the ongoing evaluation of the introduction of the monitor, the aim of this study was to explore the attitudes and perceptions of women who had worn the monitor continuously during their most recent delivery and perceptions about how it affected care. This knowledge is important to identify barriers towards adaptation in order to introduce new technology more effectively. We carried out 20 semi-structured individual interviews post-labor at two hospitals in Tanzania. A thematic content analysis was used to analyze the data. Our results indicated that the use of the monitor positively affected the women’s birth experience. It provided much-needed reassurance about the wellbeing of the child. The women considered that wearing Moyo improved care due to an increase in communication and attention from birth attendants. However, the women did not fully understand the purpose and function of the device and overestimated its capabilities. This highlights the need to improve how and when information is conveyed to women in labor. View Full-Text
Keywords: Tanzania; low-resource setting; labor care; laboring women’s attitudes; (electronic) fetal heart rate monitoring; labor monitoring; health literacy; informed consent; Moyo; wireless fetal heart rate monitor Tanzania; low-resource setting; labor care; laboring women’s attitudes; (electronic) fetal heart rate monitoring; labor monitoring; health literacy; informed consent; Moyo; wireless fetal heart rate monitor
MDPI and ACS Style

Rivenes Lafontan, S.; Sundby, J.; Ersdal, H.L.; Abeid, M.; Kidanto, H.L.; Mbekenga, C.K. “I Was Relieved to Know That My Baby Was Safe”: Women’s Attitudes and Perceptions on Using a New Electronic Fetal Heart Rate Monitor during Labor in Tanzania. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 302.

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