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Making the Case for “Whole System” Approaches: Integrating Public Health and Housing

1
Public Health, Cornwall Council, Truro TR1 3AY, UK
2
European Centre for Environment and Human Health, College of Medicine and Health, University of Exeter, Truro TR1 3HD, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(11), 2345; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15112345
Received: 20 September 2018 / Revised: 13 October 2018 / Accepted: 18 October 2018 / Published: 24 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Social, Cultural and Economic Context of Health and Social Care)
Housing conditions have been an enduring focus for public health activity throughout the modern public health era. However, the nature of the housing and health challenge has changed in response to an evolution in the understanding of the diverse factors influencing public health. Today, the traditional public health emphasis on the type and quality of housing merges with other wider determinants of health. These include the neighbourhood, community, and “place” where a house is located, but also the policies which make access to a healthy house possible and affordable for everyone. Encouragingly, these approaches to policy and action on housing have the potential to contribute to the “triple win” of health and well-being, equity, and environmental sustainability. However, more effective housing policies (and in public health in general) that adopt more systemic approaches to addressing the complex interactions between health, housing, and wider environment are needed. This paper illustrates some of the key components of the housing and health challenge in developed countries, and presents a conceptual model to co-ordinate activities that can deliver the “triple win.” This is achieved by offering a perspective on how to navigate more effectively, inclusively and across sectors when identifying sustainable housing interventions. View Full-Text
Keywords: public health; health; social care; fuel poverty; housing; air pollution; interventions; well-being; inequalities public health; health; social care; fuel poverty; housing; air pollution; interventions; well-being; inequalities
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sharpe, R.A.; Taylor, T.; Fleming, L.E.; Morrissey, K.; Morris, G.; Wigglesworth, R. Making the Case for “Whole System” Approaches: Integrating Public Health and Housing. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2345. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15112345

AMA Style

Sharpe RA, Taylor T, Fleming LE, Morrissey K, Morris G, Wigglesworth R. Making the Case for “Whole System” Approaches: Integrating Public Health and Housing. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2018; 15(11):2345. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15112345

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sharpe, Richard A., Tim Taylor, Lora E. Fleming, Karyn Morrissey, George Morris, and Rachel Wigglesworth. 2018. "Making the Case for “Whole System” Approaches: Integrating Public Health and Housing" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 15, no. 11: 2345. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15112345

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