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Open AccessArticle

The Knowledge and Awareness for Radiocesium Food Monitoring after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident in Nihonmatsu City, Fukushima Prefecture

1
Laboratory of International Epidemiology, Fukushima Branch Office, Center for International Cooperation, Dokkyo Medical University, Tochigi 321-0293, Japan
2
Department of Community and Global Health, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Tokyo 113-0033, Japan
3
Department of Radiological Sciences, Ibaraki Prefectural University of Health Sciences, Ibaraki 300-0394, Japan
4
Graduate School of Fisheries and Environmental Sciences, Nagasaki University, Nagasaki 852-8521, Japan
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(10), 2289; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15102289
Received: 31 August 2018 / Revised: 30 September 2018 / Accepted: 12 October 2018 / Published: 18 October 2018
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Health)
On 11 March 2011, Japan experienced a massive earthquake and tsunami that triggered the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant (FDNPP) accident, resulting in the release of large amounts of cesium-134 and -137 into the atmosphere. In addition to the food radioactivity control in the markets throughout the country, radiocesium concentrations in locally grown foods were voluntarily inspected and the results were shown to the residents by the local government to raise their awareness of the internal radiation contamination risk from low knowledge in Nihonmatsu City, Fukushima Prefecture. In this longitudinal study, local food products for in-home consumption were evaluated by seven different food radioactivity measuring devices in Nihonmatsu City from 2011–2017. Radiocesium was detected in local foods in Nihonmatsu City even six years after the FDNPP accident. The highest number of products tested was in 2012, with the number steadily decreasing thereafter. Most foods had contamination levels that were within the provisional regulation limits. As edible wild plants and mushrooms continue to possess high radiocesium concentrations, new trends in radioactivity in foods like seeds were discovered. This study highlights that the increased risk of radiation exposure could possibly be due to declining radiation awareness among citizens and food distributors. We recommend the continuation of food monitoring procedures at various points in the food processing line under the responsibility of the government to raise awareness for the reduction of future risks of internal exposure. View Full-Text
Keywords: radiation; food monitoring; Fukushima radiation; food monitoring; Fukushima
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kunii, N.; Fujimura, M.S.; Komasa, Y.; Kitamura, A.; Sato, H.; Takatsuji, T.; Jimba, M.; Kimura, S. The Knowledge and Awareness for Radiocesium Food Monitoring after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident in Nihonmatsu City, Fukushima Prefecture. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 2289. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15102289

AMA Style

Kunii N, Fujimura MS, Komasa Y, Kitamura A, Sato H, Takatsuji T, Jimba M, Kimura S. The Knowledge and Awareness for Radiocesium Food Monitoring after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident in Nihonmatsu City, Fukushima Prefecture. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2018; 15(10):2289. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15102289

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kunii, Nobuaki; Fujimura, Maya S.; Komasa, Yukako; Kitamura, Akiko; Sato, Hitoshi; Takatsuji, Toshihiro; Jimba, Masamine; Kimura, Shinzo. 2018. "The Knowledge and Awareness for Radiocesium Food Monitoring after the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Accident in Nihonmatsu City, Fukushima Prefecture" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 15, no. 10: 2289. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15102289

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