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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15(1), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph15010046

Surveillance of Environmental and Procedural Measures of Infection Control in the Operating Theatre Setting

1
Department of Biomedical and Neuromotor Sciences, Unit of Hygiene, Public Health and Medical Statistics, University of Bologna, via S. Giacomo 12, 40126 Bologna, Italy
2
Unit of Hygiene, Control of Healthcare Associated Infections, Local Health Authority of Bologna, Bellaria Hospital, via Altura 3, 40139 Bologna, Italy
3
Unit of Hygiene and Quality of Residential Services, Local Health Authority of Bologna, Bellaria Hospital, via Altura 3, 40139 Bologna, Italy
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 29 November 2017 / Revised: 19 December 2017 / Accepted: 27 December 2017 / Published: 28 December 2017
(This article belongs to the Section Environmental Science and Engineering)
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Abstract

The microbiological contamination of operating theatres and the lack of adherence to best practices by surgical staff represent some of the factors affecting Surgical Site Infections (SSIs). The aim of the present study was to assess the microbiological quality of operating settings and the staff compliance to the SSI evidence-based control measures. Ten operating rooms were examined for microbiological contamination of air and surfaces, after cleaning procedures, in “at rest” conditions. Furthermore, 10 surgical operations were monitored to assess staff compliance to the recommended practices. None of the air samples exceeded microbiological reference standards and only six of the 200 surface samples (3.0%) were slightly above recommended levels. Potentially pathogenic bacteria and moulds were never detected. Staff compliance to best practices varied depending on the type of behaviour investigated and the role of the operator. The major not compliant behaviours were: pre-operative skin antisepsis, crowding of the operating room and hand hygiene of the anaesthetist. The good environmental microbiological quality observed is indicative of the efficacy of the cleaning-sanitization procedures adopted. The major critical point was staff compliance to recommended practices. Awareness campaigns are therefore necessary, aimed at improving the organisation of work so as to facilitate compliance to operative protocols. View Full-Text
Keywords: surgical site infections; operating theatres; surgery cleaning procedures; microbiological contamination; evidence-based surgical good practices surgical site infections; operating theatres; surgery cleaning procedures; microbiological contamination; evidence-based surgical good practices
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Dallolio, L.; Raggi, A.; Sanna, T.; Mazzetti, M.; Orsi, A.; Zanni, A.; Farruggia, P.; Leoni, E. Surveillance of Environmental and Procedural Measures of Infection Control in the Operating Theatre Setting. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2018, 15, 46.

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