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Open AccessArticle

Impact of First Aid on Treatment Outcomes for Non-Fatal Injuries in Rural Bangladesh: Findings from an Injury and Demographic Census

1
Maternal and Child Health Division, International Centre for Diarrheal Diseases Research, GPO Box 128, Dhaka 1000, Bangladesh
2
Johns Hopkins International Injury Research Unit, Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
3
Centre for Injury Prevention and Research, House #B-162, Road #23, New DOHS, Mohakhali, Dhaka 1206, Bangladesh
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(7), 762; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14070762
Received: 24 May 2017 / Revised: 3 July 2017 / Accepted: 9 July 2017 / Published: 12 July 2017
Non-fatal injuries have a significant impact on disability, productivity, and economic cost, and first-aid can play an important role in improving non-fatal injury outcomes. Data collected from a census conducted as part of a drowning prevention project in Bangladesh was used to quantify the impact of first-aid provided by trained and untrained providers on non-fatal injuries. The census covered approximately 1.2 million people from 7 sub-districts of Bangladesh. Around 10% individuals reported an injury event in the six-month recall period. The most common injuries were falls (39%) and cuts injuries (23.4%). Overall, 81.7% of those with non-fatal injuries received first aid from a provider of whom 79.9% were non-medically trained. Individuals who received first-aid from a medically trained provider had more severe injuries and were 1.28 times more likely to show improvement or recover compared to those who received first-aid from an untrained provider. In Bangladesh, first-aid for non-fatal injuries are primarily provided by untrained providers. Given the large number of untrained providers and the known benefits of first aid to overcome morbidities associated with non-fatal injuries, public health interventions should be designed and implemented to train and improve skills of untrained providers. View Full-Text
Keywords: non-fatal injury; first-aid treatment; medically trained providers; untrained medical providers; rural; Bangladesh non-fatal injury; first-aid treatment; medically trained providers; untrained medical providers; rural; Bangladesh
MDPI and ACS Style

Hoque, D.M.E.; Islam, M.I.; Sharmin Salam, S.; Rahman, Q.S.-u.; Agrawal, P.; Rahman, A.; Rahman, F.; El-Arifeen, S.; Hyder, A.A.; Alonge, O. Impact of First Aid on Treatment Outcomes for Non-Fatal Injuries in Rural Bangladesh: Findings from an Injury and Demographic Census. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 762. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14070762

AMA Style

Hoque DME, Islam MI, Sharmin Salam S, Rahman QS-u, Agrawal P, Rahman A, Rahman F, El-Arifeen S, Hyder AA, Alonge O. Impact of First Aid on Treatment Outcomes for Non-Fatal Injuries in Rural Bangladesh: Findings from an Injury and Demographic Census. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2017; 14(7):762. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14070762

Chicago/Turabian Style

Hoque, Dewan M.E.; Islam, Md I.; Sharmin Salam, Shumona; Rahman, Qazi S.-u.; Agrawal, Priyanka; Rahman, Aminur; Rahman, Fazlur; El-Arifeen, Shams; Hyder, Adnan A.; Alonge, Olakunle. 2017. "Impact of First Aid on Treatment Outcomes for Non-Fatal Injuries in Rural Bangladesh: Findings from an Injury and Demographic Census" Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 14, no. 7: 762. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14070762

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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