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Health Co-Benefits of Green Building Design Strategies and Community Resilience to Urban Flooding: A Systematic Review of the Evidence

1
Biositu, LLC, 505D W Alabama St, Houston, TX 77006, USA
2
Department of Epidemiology, Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, 615 N Wolfe St, Baltimore, MD 21205, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(12), 1519; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14121519
Received: 16 October 2017 / Revised: 27 November 2017 / Accepted: 27 November 2017 / Published: 6 December 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change and Health: An Interdisciplinary Perspective)
Climate change is increasingly exacerbating existing population health hazards, as well as resulting in new negative health effects. Flooding is one particularly deadly example of its amplifying and expanding effect on public health. This systematic review considered evidence linking green building strategies in the Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design® (LEED) Rating System with the potential to reduce negative health outcomes following exposure to urban flooding events. Queries evaluated links between LEED credit requirements and risk of exposure to urban flooding, environmental determinants of health, co-benefits to public health outcomes, and co-benefits to built environment outcomes. Public health co-benefits to leveraging green building design to enhance flooding resilience included: improving the interface between humans and wildlife and reducing the risk of waterborne disease, flood-related morbidity and mortality, and psychological harm. We conclude that collaborations among the public health, climate change, civil society, and green building sectors to enhance community resilience to urban flooding could benefit population health. View Full-Text
Keywords: urban flood-related hazards; sustainable design; climate change mitigation; climate change adaptation; sustainable communities urban flood-related hazards; sustainable design; climate change mitigation; climate change adaptation; sustainable communities
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MDPI and ACS Style

Houghton, A.; Castillo-Salgado, C. Health Co-Benefits of Green Building Design Strategies and Community Resilience to Urban Flooding: A Systematic Review of the Evidence. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1519. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14121519

AMA Style

Houghton A, Castillo-Salgado C. Health Co-Benefits of Green Building Design Strategies and Community Resilience to Urban Flooding: A Systematic Review of the Evidence. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2017; 14(12):1519. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14121519

Chicago/Turabian Style

Houghton, Adele, and Carlos Castillo-Salgado. 2017. "Health Co-Benefits of Green Building Design Strategies and Community Resilience to Urban Flooding: A Systematic Review of the Evidence" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 14, no. 12: 1519. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14121519

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