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Open AccessArticle

Correlation Analysis of PM10 and the Incidence of Lung Cancer in Nanchang, China

by Yi Zhou 1,*, Lianshui Li 2 and Lei Hu 3
1
College of Applied Meteorology, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China
2
College of Economics and Management, Nanjing University of Information Science and Technology, Nanjing 210044, China
3
Agrometeorological Experiment Station of Jiangxi Province, Nanchang 330200, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Kevin W. Li
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14(10), 1253; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph14101253
Received: 3 September 2017 / Revised: 16 October 2017 / Accepted: 17 October 2017 / Published: 19 October 2017
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Decision Models in Green Growth and Sustainable Development)
Air pollution and lung cancer are closely related. In 2013, the World Health Organization listed outdoor air pollution as carcinogenic and regarded it as the most widespread carcinogen that humans are currently exposed to. Here, grey correlation and data envelopment analysis methods are used to determine the pollution factors causing lung cancer among residents in Nanchang, China, and identify population segments which are more susceptible to air pollution. This study shows that particulate matter with particle sizes below 10 micron (PM10) is most closely related to the incidence of lung cancer among air pollution factors including annual mean concentrations of SO2, NO2, PM10, annual haze days, and annual mean Air Pollution Index/Air Quality Index (API/AQI). Air pollution has a greater impact on urban inhabitants as compared to rural inhabitants. When gender differences are considered, women are more likely to develop lung cancer due to air pollution. Smokers are more likely to suffer from lung cancer. These results provide a reference for the government to formulate policies to reduce air pollutant emissions and strengthen anti-smoking measures. View Full-Text
Keywords: PM10; air pollution; lung cancer; grey correlation; data envelopment analysis PM10; air pollution; lung cancer; grey correlation; data envelopment analysis
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Zhou, Y.; Li, L.; Hu, L. Correlation Analysis of PM10 and the Incidence of Lung Cancer in Nanchang, China. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2017, 14, 1253.

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