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Daily Rhythms of Hunger and Satiety in Healthy Men during One Week of Sleep Restriction and Circadian Misalignment

Appleton Institute for Behavioural Science, Central Queensland University, P.O. Box 42, Goodwood 5034, Australia
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Academic Editors: Drew Dawson, Paul Robers, Lynn Meuleners, Libby Brook, Sally Ferguson, Greg Roach and Charli Sargent
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(2), 170; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13020170
Received: 31 July 2015 / Revised: 14 September 2015 / Accepted: 29 September 2015 / Published: 29 January 2016
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Proceedings from 9th International Conference on Managing Fatigue)
The impact of sleep restriction on the endogenous circadian rhythms of hunger and satiety were examined in 28 healthy young men. Participants were scheduled to 2 × 24-h days of baseline followed by 8 × 28-h days of forced desynchrony during which sleep was either moderately restricted (equivalent to 6 h in bed/24 h; n = 14) or severely restricted (equivalent to 4 h in bed/24 h; n = 14). Self-reported hunger and satisfaction were assessed every 2.5 h during wake periods using visual analogue scales. Participants were served standardised meals and snacks at regular intervals and were not permitted to eat ad libitum. Core body temperature was continuously recorded with rectal thermistors to determine circadian phase. Both hunger and satiety exhibited a marked endogenous circadian rhythm. Hunger was highest, and satiety was lowest, in the biological evening (i.e., ~17:00–21:00 h) whereas hunger was lowest, and satiety was highest in the biological night (i.e., 01:00–05:00 h). The results are consistent with expectations based on previous reports and may explain in some part the decrease in appetite that is commonly reported by individuals who are required to work at night. Interestingly, the endogenous rhythms of hunger and satiety do not appear to be altered by severe—as compared to moderate—sleep restriction. View Full-Text
Keywords: sleep restriction; hunger; satiety; core body temperature; visual analogue scales; forced desynchrony sleep restriction; hunger; satiety; core body temperature; visual analogue scales; forced desynchrony
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MDPI and ACS Style

Sargent, C.; Zhou, X.; Matthews, R.W.; Darwent, D.; Roach, G.D. Daily Rhythms of Hunger and Satiety in Healthy Men during One Week of Sleep Restriction and Circadian Misalignment. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 170. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13020170

AMA Style

Sargent C, Zhou X, Matthews RW, Darwent D, Roach GD. Daily Rhythms of Hunger and Satiety in Healthy Men during One Week of Sleep Restriction and Circadian Misalignment. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2016; 13(2):170. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13020170

Chicago/Turabian Style

Sargent, Charli, Xuan Zhou, Raymond W. Matthews, David Darwent, and Gregory D. Roach. 2016. "Daily Rhythms of Hunger and Satiety in Healthy Men during One Week of Sleep Restriction and Circadian Misalignment" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 13, no. 2: 170. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13020170

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