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The Other Side: How does Informed Choice Affect Induced Abortions among Reproductive-Age Immigrant Women in China—A Cross-Sectional Study

by Chuanning Yu 1,2,3, Junqing Wu 1,2,*, Yuyan Li 1,2, Ying Zhou 1,2, Rui Zhao 1,2, Honglei Ji 1,2, Yi-Ran Li 1,2, Ying Han 4 and Qi Tong 5
1
School of Public Health, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China
2
Key Lab of Reproduction Regulation of NPFPC, SIPPR, IRD, Fudan University, Shanghai 200032, China
3
Guizhou Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Guiyang 550002, China
4
Health and Family Planning Commission, Dong Cheng District, Beijing 100005, China
5
Institute for Population and Family Planning, Chongqing 400000, China
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Janet Seeley
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13(10), 1038; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph13101038
Received: 12 June 2016 / Revised: 30 September 2016 / Accepted: 17 October 2016 / Published: 24 October 2016
This study attempted to explore how informed choice on contraceptive methods influenced induced abortions among reproductive-age immigrant women in China. A total of 3230 participants were recruited in Beijing, Shanghai, and Chongqing. Information on informed choice was collected by questionnaires. The annual incidence rate (spells) of induced abortions was 0.46 (1500/3230) among the participants. The sequence from the highest score to the lowest was long-term, short-term and natural contraceptive methods (p < 0.0001). Significant differences of rates in induced abortions were found in region, occupation, length of the first immigration up to now (year), purpose for immigration, number of children, marital status, sex preference, contraceptive methods, deciders of contraceptive methods and side effects. In the zero-inflated negative binomial model, the joint impacts showed when a participant with one child employed condoms or family planning service providers as the deciders of contraceptive methods introduced intrauterine devices, the occurrence of induced abortions was more likely to be reduced. Women who underwent side effects using pills were more likely to have had induced abortions. View Full-Text
Keywords: induced abortion; informed choice; migrants; contraceptive methods; China induced abortion; informed choice; migrants; contraceptive methods; China
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Yu, C.; Wu, J.; Li, Y.; Zhou, Y.; Zhao, R.; Ji, H.; Li, Y.-R.; Han, Y.; Tong, Q. The Other Side: How does Informed Choice Affect Induced Abortions among Reproductive-Age Immigrant Women in China—A Cross-Sectional Study. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2016, 13, 1038.

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