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Article

Vulnerabilities to Temperature Effects on Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions in South Korea

1
Department of Public Health, Graduate School, Korea University, 73, Inchon-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, Korea
2
Department of Preventive Medicine, College of Medicine, Korea University, 73, Inchon-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, Korea
3
Graduate School of Public Health, Graduate School, Korea University, 73, Inchon-ro, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02841, Korea
4
Department of Statistics, College of Natural Science, Sungshin Women’s University, 249-1, Dongseon-dong 3-ga, Seongbuk-gu, Seoul 02844, Korea
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Jan Semenza
Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12(11), 14571-14588; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph121114571
Received: 10 October 2015 / Revised: 9 November 2015 / Accepted: 10 November 2015 / Published: 13 November 2015
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Climate Change and Human Health)
Most previous studies have focused on the association between acute myocardial function (AMI) and temperature by gender and age. Recently, however, concern has also arisen about those most susceptible to the effects of temperature according to socioeconomic status (SES). The objective of this study was to determine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI by subpopulations (gender, age, living area, and individual SES) in South Korea. The Korea National Health Insurance (KNHI) database was used to examine the effect of heat and cold on hospital admissions for AMI during 2004–2012. We analyzed the increase in AMI hospital admissions both above and below a threshold temperature using Poisson generalized additive models (GAMs) for hot, cold, and warm weather. The Medicaid group, the lowest SES group, had a significantly higher RR of 1.37 (95% CI: 1.07–1.76) for heat and 1.11 (95% CI: 1.04–1.20) for cold among subgroups, while also showing distinctly higher risk curves than NHI for both hot and cold weather. In additions, females, older age group, and those living in urban areas had higher risks from hot and cold temperatures than males, younger age group, and those living in rural areas. View Full-Text
Keywords: myocardial infarction; hospital admissions; temperature; socioeconomic status; Medicaid; gender; age myocardial infarction; hospital admissions; temperature; socioeconomic status; Medicaid; gender; age
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MDPI and ACS Style

Kwon, B.Y.; Lee, E.; Lee, S.; Heo, S.; Jo, K.; Kim, J.; Park, M.S. Vulnerabilities to Temperature Effects on Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions in South Korea. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2015, 12, 14571-14588. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph121114571

AMA Style

Kwon BY, Lee E, Lee S, Heo S, Jo K, Kim J, Park MS. Vulnerabilities to Temperature Effects on Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions in South Korea. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health. 2015; 12(11):14571-14588. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph121114571

Chicago/Turabian Style

Kwon, Bo Y., Eunil Lee, Suji Lee, Seulkee Heo, Kyunghee Jo, Jinsun Kim, and Man S. Park. 2015. "Vulnerabilities to Temperature Effects on Acute Myocardial Infarction Hospital Admissions in South Korea" International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 12, no. 11: 14571-14588. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph121114571

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