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Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10(12), 7193-7206; doi:10.3390/ijerph10127193
Article

Characterising the Smoking Status and Quit Smoking Behaviour of Aboriginal Health Workers in South Australia

1
, 2
, 2
, 1
, 3
, 2
 and 2,*
1 Cancer Council South Australia, P.O. Box 929, Unley BC, South Australia 5061, Australia 2 Social Epidemiology and Evaluation Research Group, School of Population Health, University of South Australia, City East Campus, North Terrace, G.P.O. Box 2471, CEA-01, Adelaide, South Australia 5001, Australia 3 Aboriginal Health Council SA, P.O. Box 981, Unley, South Australia 5061, Australia
* Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 18 October 2013 / Revised: 27 November 2013 / Accepted: 3 December 2013 / Published: 13 December 2013
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Abstract

The study objectives were to characterise the smoking status and quit smoking behaviour of Aboriginal Health Workers (AHWs) in South Australia (SA), Australia; and identify the psychosocial, socio-demographic, and household smoking characteristics that distinguish smokers from quitters and never smokers. A self-reported cross-sectional survey was completed by AHWs in SA. Non-parametric statistics were used for inferential analyses. Eighty-five AHWs completed surveys representing a response rate of 63.0%. The prevalence of current smokers was 50.6%. Non-smokers (49.5%) included quitters (22.4%) and never smokers (27.1%). Smoking status did not differ by gender or geographic location. Of current smokers, 69.0% demonstrated a readiness to quit and 50.0% had made at least one quit attempt in the last 12 months. Compared to quitters and never smokers, current smokers expressed lower emotional wellbeing, and three times as many resided with another smoker. Quitters had the highest levels of perceived social support and part-time employment. A high proportion of AHWs who smoke desire, and are ready to quit. Individual, social and household factors differentiated smokers from non-smokers and quitters. Social support, and relationships and structures that favour social support, are implicated as necessary to enable AHWs who smoke to act on their desire to quit smoking.
Keywords: smoking cessation; Aboriginal health workers; tobacco control; participatory research smoking cessation; Aboriginal health workers; tobacco control; participatory research
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited.

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Maksimovic, L.; Paquet, C.; Daniel, M.; Stewart, H.; Chong, A.; Lekkas, P.; Cargo, M. Characterising the Smoking Status and Quit Smoking Behaviour of Aboriginal Health Workers in South Australia. Int. J. Environ. Res. Public Health 2013, 10, 7193-7206.

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