Next Article in Journal
Natural Products Repertoire of the Red Sea
Previous Article in Journal
Gracilosulfates A–G, Monosulfated Polyoxygenated Steroids from the Marine Sponge Haliclona gracilis
Previous Article in Special Issue
Bioactive Molecular Networking for Mapping the Antimicrobial Constituents of the Baltic Brown Alga Fucus vesiculosus
Article

Genome Mining, Microbial Interactions, and Molecular Networking Reveals New Dibromoalterochromides from Strains of Pseudoalteromonas of Coiba National Park-Panama

1
Centro de Biodiversidad y Descubrimiento de Drogas, Instituto de Investigaciones Científicas y Servicios de Alta Tecnología (INDICASAT), Clayton, Panama City 0843-01103, Panama
2
Department of Biotechnology, Acharya Nagarjuna University, Nagarjuna Nagar, Guntur 522510, India
3
Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, Balboa Ancón, Panama City 0843-03092, Panama
4
Collaborative Mass Spectrometry Innovation Center, Skaggs School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of California San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093, USA
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Mar. Drugs 2020, 18(9), 456; https://doi.org/10.3390/md18090456
Received: 14 July 2020 / Revised: 27 August 2020 / Accepted: 31 August 2020 / Published: 3 September 2020
The marine bacterial genus Pseudoalteromonas is known for their ability to produce antimicrobial compounds. The metabolite-producing capacity of Pseudoalteromonas has been associated with strain pigmentation; however, the genomic basis of their antimicrobial capacity remains to be explained. In this study, we sequenced the whole genome of six Pseudoalteromonas strains (three pigmented and three non-pigmented), with the purpose of identifying biosynthetic gene clusters (BGCs) associated to compounds we detected via microbial interactions along through MS-based molecular networking. The genomes were assembled and annotated using the SPAdes and RAST pipelines and mined for the identification of gene clusters involved in secondary metabolism using the antiSMASH database. Nineteen BGCs were detected for each non-pigmented strain, while more than thirty BGCs were found for two of the pigmented strains. Among these, the groups of genes of nonribosomal peptide synthetases (NRPS) that code for bromoalterochromides stand out the most. Our results show that all strains possess BGCs for the production of secondary metabolites, and a considerable number of distinct polyketide synthases (PKS) and NRPS clusters are present in pigmented strains. Furthermore, the molecular networking analyses revealed two new molecules produced during microbial interactions: the dibromoalterochromides D/D’ (11–12). View Full-Text
Keywords: Pseudoalteromonas; bromoalterochromides; antimicrobials; genome mining; biosynthetic gene cluster; MS/MS molecular networking; Coiba National Park Pseudoalteromonas; bromoalterochromides; antimicrobials; genome mining; biosynthetic gene cluster; MS/MS molecular networking; Coiba National Park
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Atencio, L.A.; Boya P., C.A.; Martin H., C.; Mejía, L.C.; Dorrestein, P.C.; Gutiérrez, M. Genome Mining, Microbial Interactions, and Molecular Networking Reveals New Dibromoalterochromides from Strains of Pseudoalteromonas of Coiba National Park-Panama. Mar. Drugs 2020, 18, 456. https://doi.org/10.3390/md18090456

AMA Style

Atencio LA, Boya P. CA, Martin H. C, Mejía LC, Dorrestein PC, Gutiérrez M. Genome Mining, Microbial Interactions, and Molecular Networking Reveals New Dibromoalterochromides from Strains of Pseudoalteromonas of Coiba National Park-Panama. Marine Drugs. 2020; 18(9):456. https://doi.org/10.3390/md18090456

Chicago/Turabian Style

Atencio, Librada A.; Boya P., Cristopher A.; Martin H., Christian; Mejía, Luis C.; Dorrestein, Pieter C.; Gutiérrez, Marcelino. 2020. "Genome Mining, Microbial Interactions, and Molecular Networking Reveals New Dibromoalterochromides from Strains of Pseudoalteromonas of Coiba National Park-Panama" Mar. Drugs 18, no. 9: 456. https://doi.org/10.3390/md18090456

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop