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Article

Less Vibrotactile Feedback Is Effective to Improve Human Balance Control during Sensory Cues Alteration

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Faculté de Médecine, Département de Kinésiologie, Université Laval, Quebec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
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Centre Interdisciplinaire de Recherche en Réadaptation et Intégration Sociale (Cirris) du CIUSSS de la Capitale Nationale, Quebec, QC G1M 2S8, Canada
3
Faculté des Sciences et de Génie, Département de Génie Électrique et de Génie Informatique, Université Laval, Quebec, QC G1V 0A6, Canada
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: J. Lucas McKay
Sensors 2022, 22(17), 6432; https://doi.org/10.3390/s22176432
Received: 8 July 2022 / Revised: 22 August 2022 / Accepted: 24 August 2022 / Published: 26 August 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Advances in Sensing Body Motion for Neuromechanics and Therapeutics)
For individuals with altered sensory cues, vibrotactile feedback improves their balance control. However, should vibrotactile feedback be provided every time balance control is compromised, or only one-third of the time their balance is compromised? We hypothesized that vibrotactile feedback would improve balance control more when provided every time their balance is compromised. Healthy young adults were randomly assigned to two groups: group 33% feedback (6 males and 6 females) and group 100% feedback (6 males and 6 females). Vibrotactile feedbacks related to the body’s sway angle amplitude and direction were provided, while participants stood upright on a foam surface with their eyes closed. Then, we assessed if balance control improvement lasted when the vibrotactile feedback was removed (i.e., post-vibration condition). Finally, we verified whether or not vibrotactile feedback unrelated to the body’s sway angle and direction (sham condition) altered balance control. The results revealed no significant group difference in balance control improvement during vibrotactile feedback. Immediately following vibrotactile feedback, both groups reduced their balance control commands; body sway velocity and the ground reaction forces variability decreased. For both groups, unrelated vibrotactile feedback worsened balance control. These results confirmed that participants processed and implemented vibrotactile feedback to control their body sways. Less vibrotactile feedback was effective in improving balance control. View Full-Text
Keywords: upright standing; body sway; sensory augmentation; sensorimotor control; vibrotactile feedbacks upright standing; body sway; sensory augmentation; sensorimotor control; vibrotactile feedbacks
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MDPI and ACS Style

Anctil, N.; Malenfant, Z.; Cyr, J.-P.; Turcot, K.; Simoneau, M. Less Vibrotactile Feedback Is Effective to Improve Human Balance Control during Sensory Cues Alteration. Sensors 2022, 22, 6432. https://doi.org/10.3390/s22176432

AMA Style

Anctil N, Malenfant Z, Cyr J-P, Turcot K, Simoneau M. Less Vibrotactile Feedback Is Effective to Improve Human Balance Control during Sensory Cues Alteration. Sensors. 2022; 22(17):6432. https://doi.org/10.3390/s22176432

Chicago/Turabian Style

Anctil, Noémie, Zachary Malenfant, Jean-Philippe Cyr, Katia Turcot, and Martin Simoneau. 2022. "Less Vibrotactile Feedback Is Effective to Improve Human Balance Control during Sensory Cues Alteration" Sensors 22, no. 17: 6432. https://doi.org/10.3390/s22176432

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