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Article

Low-Complexity Design and Validation of Wireless Motion Sensor Node to Support Physiotherapy

1
DRAMCO, Department of Electrical Engineering, Ghent Technology Campus, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium
2
Department of Civil Engineering, Geomatics Section, Ghent Technology Campus, Katholieke Universiteit Leuven, B-9000 Ghent, Belgium
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sensors 2020, 20(21), 6362; https://doi.org/10.3390/s20216362
Received: 29 September 2020 / Revised: 27 October 2020 / Accepted: 4 November 2020 / Published: 7 November 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Low-Cost Sensors and Biological Signals)
We present a motion sensor node to support physiotherapy, based on an Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU). The node has wireless interfaces for both data exchange and charging, and is built based on commodity components. It hence provides an affordable solution with a low threshold to technology adoption. We share the hardware design and explain the calibration and validation procedures. The sensor node has an autonomy of 28 h in operation and a standby time of 8 months. On-device sensor fusion yields static results of on average 3.28° with a drift of 2° per half hour. The final prototype weighs 38 g and measures ø6 cm × 1.5 cm. The resulting motion sensor node presents an easy to use device for both live monitoring of movements as well as interpreting the data afterward. It opens opportunities to support and follow up treatment in medical cabinets as well as remotely. View Full-Text
Keywords: physiotherapy; e-health; motion sensing; wireless charging; wireless connectivity; low power physiotherapy; e-health; motion sensing; wireless charging; wireless connectivity; low power
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MDPI and ACS Style

Cappelle, J.; Monteyne, L.; Van Mulders, J.; Goossens, S.; Vergauwen, M.; Van der Perre, L. Low-Complexity Design and Validation of Wireless Motion Sensor Node to Support Physiotherapy. Sensors 2020, 20, 6362. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20216362

AMA Style

Cappelle J, Monteyne L, Van Mulders J, Goossens S, Vergauwen M, Van der Perre L. Low-Complexity Design and Validation of Wireless Motion Sensor Node to Support Physiotherapy. Sensors. 2020; 20(21):6362. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20216362

Chicago/Turabian Style

Cappelle, Jona, Laura Monteyne, Jarne Van Mulders, Sarah Goossens, Maarten Vergauwen, and Liesbet Van der Perre. 2020. "Low-Complexity Design and Validation of Wireless Motion Sensor Node to Support Physiotherapy" Sensors 20, no. 21: 6362. https://doi.org/10.3390/s20216362

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