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Sensors for Expert Grip Force Profiling: Towards Benchmarking Manual Control of a Robotic Device for Surgical Tool Movements

ICube Lab, UMR 7357 CNRS, Robotics Department, University of Strasbourg, 6700 Strasbourg, France
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This paper is an extended version of our previous work published as “Batmaz, A.U.; Falek, A.M.; Zorn, L.; Nageotte, F.; Zanne, P.; de Mathelin, M.; Dresp-Langley, B. Novice and expert behavior while using a robot controlled surgery system, IEEE Proceedings of BioMed2017, Innsbruck, Austria, 20–21 February 2017”.
Sensors 2019, 19(20), 4575; https://doi.org/10.3390/s19204575
Received: 26 July 2019 / Revised: 4 October 2019 / Accepted: 17 October 2019 / Published: 21 October 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Wearable and Nearable Biosensors and Systems for Healthcare)
STRAS (Single access Transluminal Robotic Assistant for Surgeons) is a new robotic system based on the Anubis® platform of Karl Storz for application to intra-luminal surgical procedures. Pre-clinical testing of STRAS has recently permitted to demonstrate major advantages of the system in comparison with classic procedures. Benchmark methods permitting to establish objective criteria for ‘expertise’ need to be worked out now to effectively train surgeons on this new system in the near future. STRAS consists of three cable-driven sub-systems, one endoscope serving as guide, and two flexible instruments. The flexible instruments have three degrees of freedom and can be teleoperated by a single user via two specially designed master interfaces. In this study, small force sensors sewn into a wearable glove to ergonomically fit the master handles of the robotic system were employed for monitoring the forces applied by an expert and a trainee (complete novice) during all the steps of surgical task execution in a simulator task (4-step-pick-and-drop). Analysis of grip-force profiles is performed sensor by sensor to bring to the fore specific differences in handgrip force profiles in specific sensor locations on anatomically relevant parts of the fingers and hand controlling the master/slave system. View Full-Text
Keywords: robotic assistant systems for surgery; expertise; pick-and-drop simulator task; grip force profiles; grip force control robotic assistant systems for surgery; expertise; pick-and-drop simulator task; grip force profiles; grip force control
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de Mathelin, M.; Nageotte, F.; Zanne, P.; Dresp-Langley, B. Sensors for Expert Grip Force Profiling: Towards Benchmarking Manual Control of a Robotic Device for Surgical Tool Movements. Sensors 2019, 19, 4575.

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