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Habitat and Landform Types Drive the Distribution of Carabid Beetles at High Altitudes
 
 
Article

Unequivocal Differences in Predation Pressure on Large Carabid Beetles between Forestry Treatments

MTA-ELTE-MTM Ecology Research Group, Biological Institute, Eötvös Loránd University, Pázmány Péter Sétány 1/C, H-1117 Budapest, Hungary
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Academic Editor: Tibor Magura
Diversity 2021, 13(10), 484; https://doi.org/10.3390/d13100484
Received: 17 September 2021 / Revised: 30 September 2021 / Accepted: 1 October 2021 / Published: 3 October 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Faunistical and Ecological Studies on Carabid Beetles)
Carabid beetles (Coleoptera: Carabidae) are considered as one of the most cardinal invertebrate predatory groups in many ecosystems, including forests. Previous studies revealed that the predation pressure provided by carabids significantly regulates the ecological network of invertebrates. Nevertheless, there is no direct estimation of the predation risk on carabids, which can be an important proxy for the phenomenon called ecological trap. In our study, we aimed to explore the predation pressure on carabids using 3D-printed decoys installed in two types of forestry treatments, preparation cuts and clear cuts, and control plots in a Hungarian oak–hornbeam forest. We estimated the seasonal, diurnal and treatment-specific aspects of the predation pressure on carabids. Our results reveal a significantly higher predation risk on carabids in both forestry treatments than in the control. Moreover, it was also higher in the nighttime than daytime. Contrarily, no effects of season and microhabitat features were found. Based on these clues we assume that habitats modified by forestry practices may act as an ecological trap for carabids. Our findings contribute to a better understanding of how ecological interactions between species may change in a modified forest environment. View Full-Text
Keywords: 3D printing; artificial prey; behavior; clear cut; ecological trap; ground beetles; preparation cut; sentinel prey method 3D printing; artificial prey; behavior; clear cut; ecological trap; ground beetles; preparation cut; sentinel prey method
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MDPI and ACS Style

Růžičková, J.; Elek, Z. Unequivocal Differences in Predation Pressure on Large Carabid Beetles between Forestry Treatments. Diversity 2021, 13, 484. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13100484

AMA Style

Růžičková J, Elek Z. Unequivocal Differences in Predation Pressure on Large Carabid Beetles between Forestry Treatments. Diversity. 2021; 13(10):484. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13100484

Chicago/Turabian Style

Růžičková, Jana, and Zoltán Elek. 2021. "Unequivocal Differences in Predation Pressure on Large Carabid Beetles between Forestry Treatments" Diversity 13, no. 10: 484. https://doi.org/10.3390/d13100484

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