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Review

Linking Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) to Abiotic and Biotic Feedbacks in Plant Microbiomes: The Dose Makes the Poison

1
Department of Biology, Stanford University, Stanford, CA 94305, USA
2
Department of Biology, Francis Marion University, Florence, SC 29502, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Tsanko Gechev and Veselin Petrov
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23(8), 4402; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23084402
Received: 17 March 2022 / Revised: 13 April 2022 / Accepted: 13 April 2022 / Published: 15 April 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue ROS and Abiotic Stress in Plants 2.0)
In nature, plants develop in complex, adaptive environments. Plants must therefore respond efficiently to environmental stressors to maintain homeostasis and enhance their fitness. Although many coordinated processes remain integral for achieving homeostasis and driving plant development, reactive oxygen species (ROS) function as critical, fast-acting orchestrators that link abiotic and biotic responses to plant homeostasis and development. In addition to the suite of enzymatic and non-enzymatic ROS processing pathways that plants possess, they also rely on their microbiota to buffer and maintain the oxidative window needed to balance anabolic and catabolic processes. Strong evidence has been communicated recently that links ROS regulation to the aggregated function(s) of commensal microbiota and plant-growth-promoting microbes. To date, many reports have put forth insightful syntheses that either detail ROS regulation across plant development (independent of plant microbiota) or examine abiotic–biotic feedbacks in plant microbiomes (independent of clear emphases on ROS regulation). Here we provide a novel synthesis that incorporates recent findings regarding ROS and plant development in the context of both microbiota regulation and plant-associated microbes. Specifically, we discuss various roles of ROS across plant development to strengthen the links between plant microbiome functioning and ROS regulation for both basic and applied research aims. View Full-Text
Keywords: abiotic–biotic feedbacks; reactive oxygen species (ROS); plant microbiome abiotic–biotic feedbacks; reactive oxygen species (ROS); plant microbiome
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MDPI and ACS Style

Berrios, L.; Rentsch, J.D. Linking Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) to Abiotic and Biotic Feedbacks in Plant Microbiomes: The Dose Makes the Poison. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2022, 23, 4402. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23084402

AMA Style

Berrios L, Rentsch JD. Linking Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) to Abiotic and Biotic Feedbacks in Plant Microbiomes: The Dose Makes the Poison. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2022; 23(8):4402. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23084402

Chicago/Turabian Style

Berrios, Louis, and Jeremy D. Rentsch. 2022. "Linking Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS) to Abiotic and Biotic Feedbacks in Plant Microbiomes: The Dose Makes the Poison" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 23, no. 8: 4402. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms23084402

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