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The Complexities of Organ Crosstalk in Phosphate Homeostasis: Time to Put Phosphate Sensing Back in the Limelight

1
Department of Neuroscience, Physiology and Pharmacology, Royal Free Campus, University College London, London NW3 2PF, UK
2
CHU de Nantes, Université de Nantes, F-44042 Nantes, France
3
Inserm, UMR 1229, RMeS Regenerative Medicine and Skeleton, Université de Nantes, ONIRIS, F-44042 Nantes, France
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Victor Sorribas
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(11), 5701; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22115701
Received: 21 March 2021 / Revised: 13 May 2021 / Accepted: 21 May 2021 / Published: 27 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Mechanisms of Phosphate Transport)
Phosphate homeostasis is essential for health and is achieved via interaction between the bone, kidney, small intestine, and parathyroid glands and via intricate processes involving phosphate transporters, phosphate sensors, and circulating hormones. Numerous genetic and acquired disorders are associated with disruption in these processes and can lead to significant morbidity and mortality. The role of the kidney in phosphate homeostasis is well known, although it is recognized that the cellular mechanisms in murine models and humans are different. Intestinal phosphate transport also appears to differ in humans and rodents, with recent studies demonstrating a dominant role for the paracellular pathway. The existence of phosphate sensing has been acknowledged for decades; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. At least three phosphate sensors have emerged. PiT2 and FGFR1c both act as phosphate sensors controlling Fibroblast Growth Factor 23 secretion in bone, whereas the calcium-sensing receptor controls parathyroid hormone secretion in response to extracellular phosphate. All three of the proposed sensors are expressed in the kidney and intestine but their exact function in these organs is unknown. Understanding organ interactions and the mechanisms involved in phosphate sensing requires significant research to develop novel approaches for the treatment of phosphate homeostasis disorders. View Full-Text
Keywords: phosphate transporter; Slc34; Slc20; phosphate homeostasis phosphate transporter; Slc34; Slc20; phosphate homeostasis
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MDPI and ACS Style

Figueres, L.; Beck-Cormier, S.; Beck, L.; Marks, J. The Complexities of Organ Crosstalk in Phosphate Homeostasis: Time to Put Phosphate Sensing Back in the Limelight. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 5701. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22115701

AMA Style

Figueres L, Beck-Cormier S, Beck L, Marks J. The Complexities of Organ Crosstalk in Phosphate Homeostasis: Time to Put Phosphate Sensing Back in the Limelight. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(11):5701. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22115701

Chicago/Turabian Style

Figueres, Lucile, Sarah Beck-Cormier, Laurent Beck, and Joanne Marks. 2021. "The Complexities of Organ Crosstalk in Phosphate Homeostasis: Time to Put Phosphate Sensing Back in the Limelight" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 11: 5701. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22115701

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