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Multifaceted Roles of CD5L in Infectious and Sterile Inflammation
Review

Contribution of Evolutionary Selected Immune Gene Polymorphism to Immune-Related Disorders: The Case of Lymphocyte Scavenger Receptors CD5 and CD6

1
Immunoreceptors del Sistema Innat i Adaptatiu, Institut d’Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, 08036 Barcelona, Spain
2
Servei d’Immunologia, Hospital Clínic de Barcelona, 08036 Barcelona, Spain
3
Departament de Biomedicina, Universitat de Barcelona, 08036 Barcelona, Spain
4
Department of Experimental and Health Sciences, Institute of Evolutionary Biology (UPF-CSIC), Universitat Pompeu Fabra, 08003 Barcelona, Spain
5
Centro de Investigación Biomédica en Red de Salud Mental (CIBERSAM), 43206 Reus, Spain
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Alexandre M. Carmo
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22(10), 5315; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22105315
Received: 18 April 2021 / Revised: 7 May 2021 / Accepted: 11 May 2021 / Published: 18 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Scavenger Receptors in Inflammation)
Pathogens are one of the main selective pressures that ancestral humans had to adapt to. Components of the immune response system have been preferential targets of natural selection in response to such pathogen-driven pressure. In turn, there is compelling evidence showing that positively selected immune gene variants conferring increased resistance to past or present infectious agents are today associated with increased risk for autoimmune or inflammatory disorders but decreased risk of cancer, the other side of the same coin. CD5 and CD6 are lymphocytic scavenger receptors at the interphase of the innate and adaptive immune responses since they are involved in both: (i) microbial-associated pattern recognition; and (ii) modulation of intracellular signals mediated by the clonotypic antigen-specific receptor present in T and B cells (TCR and BCR, respectively). Here, we review available information on CD5 and CD6 as targets of natural selection as well as on the role of CD5 and CD6 variation in autoimmunity and cancer. View Full-Text
Keywords: scavenger receptors; CD5; CD6; immune response; cancer; autoimmunity; infections; natural selection; human genetics; single nucleotide polymorphisms scavenger receptors; CD5; CD6; immune response; cancer; autoimmunity; infections; natural selection; human genetics; single nucleotide polymorphisms
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MDPI and ACS Style

Casadó-Llombart, S.; Velasco-de Andrés, M.; Català, C.; Leyton-Pereira, A.; Lozano, F.; Bosch, E. Contribution of Evolutionary Selected Immune Gene Polymorphism to Immune-Related Disorders: The Case of Lymphocyte Scavenger Receptors CD5 and CD6. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2021, 22, 5315. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22105315

AMA Style

Casadó-Llombart S, Velasco-de Andrés M, Català C, Leyton-Pereira A, Lozano F, Bosch E. Contribution of Evolutionary Selected Immune Gene Polymorphism to Immune-Related Disorders: The Case of Lymphocyte Scavenger Receptors CD5 and CD6. International Journal of Molecular Sciences. 2021; 22(10):5315. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22105315

Chicago/Turabian Style

Casadó-Llombart, Sergi, María Velasco-de Andrés, Cristina Català, Alejandra Leyton-Pereira, Francisco Lozano, and Elena Bosch. 2021. "Contribution of Evolutionary Selected Immune Gene Polymorphism to Immune-Related Disorders: The Case of Lymphocyte Scavenger Receptors CD5 and CD6" International Journal of Molecular Sciences 22, no. 10: 5315. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms22105315

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