Next Article in Journal
Automated Exploration of Free Energy Landscapes Based on Umbrella Integration
Next Article in Special Issue
Inhibition of Arachidonate 12/15-Lipoxygenase Improves α-Galactosidase Efficacy in iPSC-Derived Cardiomyocytes from Fabry Patients
Previous Article in Journal
Microfabrication-Based Three-Dimensional (3-D) Extracellular Matrix Microenvironments for Cancer and Other Diseases
Previous Article in Special Issue
From the Psychiatrist’s Couch to Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells: Bipolar Disease in a Dish
Article Menu
Issue 4 (April) cover image

Export Article

Open AccessReview

Disease Modeling Using 3D Organoids Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

1
Disease Modeling and Therapeutics Laboratory, A*STAR Institute of Molecular and Cell Biology, 61 Biopolis Drive Proteos, Singapore 138673, Singapore
2
Department of Biological Sciences, National University of Singapore, Singapore 117543, Singapore
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
These authors contributed equally to this work.
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19(4), 936; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms19040936
Received: 28 February 2018 / Revised: 13 March 2018 / Accepted: 21 March 2018 / Published: 21 March 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Disease Modeling Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells)
  |  
PDF [799 KB, uploaded 3 May 2018]
  |  

Abstract

The rising interest in human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPSC)-derived organoid culture has stemmed from the manipulation of various combinations of directed multi-lineage differentiation and morphogenetic processes that mimic organogenesis. Organoids are three-dimensional (3D) structures that are comprised of multiple cell types, self-organized to recapitulate embryonic and tissue development in vitro. This model has been shown to be superior to conventional two-dimensional (2D) cell culture methods in mirroring functionality, architecture, and geometric features of tissues seen in vivo. This review serves to highlight recent advances in the 3D organoid technology for use in modeling complex hereditary diseases, cancer, host–microbe interactions, and possible use in translational and personalized medicine where organoid cultures were used to uncover diagnostic biomarkers for early disease detection via high throughput pharmaceutical screening. In addition, this review also aims to discuss the advantages and shortcomings of utilizing organoids in disease modeling. In summary, studying human diseases using hiPSC-derived organoids may better illustrate the processes involved due to similarities in the architecture and microenvironment present in an organoid, which also allows drug responses to be properly recapitulated in vitro. View Full-Text
Keywords: 3D organoids; disease modeling; human induced pluripotent stem cells; microenvironment; neurodevelopmental disorders; drug screening; infectious diseases; hereditary diseases; genome editing; CRISPR/Cas-9 3D organoids; disease modeling; human induced pluripotent stem cells; microenvironment; neurodevelopmental disorders; drug screening; infectious diseases; hereditary diseases; genome editing; CRISPR/Cas-9
Figures

Graphical abstract

This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
SciFeed

Share & Cite This Article

MDPI and ACS Style

Ho, B.X.; Pek, N.M.Q.; Soh, B.-S. Disease Modeling Using 3D Organoids Derived from Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 936.

Show more citation formats Show less citations formats

Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Related Articles

Article Metrics

Article Access Statistics

1

Comments

[Return to top]
Int. J. Mol. Sci. EISSN 1422-0067 Published by MDPI AG, Basel, Switzerland RSS E-Mail Table of Contents Alert
Back to Top