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The Role of Bacterial Biofilms and Surface Components in Plant-Bacterial Associations

1
Department of Molecular Biology, National University of Río Cuarto, Ruta 36 Km 601, Río Cuarto, Córdoba X5804BYA, Argentina
2
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, National University of Río Cuarto, Ruta 36 Km 601, Córdoba X5804BYA, Argentina
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Current address: Department of Cell and Organism Biology, Lund University, Sölvegatan 35, Lund 22362, Sweden
Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2013, 14(8), 15838-15859; https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms140815838
Received: 24 May 2013 / Revised: 18 June 2013 / Accepted: 28 June 2013 / Published: 30 July 2013
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Biofilms: Extracellular Bastions of Bacteria)
The role of bacterial surface components in combination with bacterial functional signals in the process of biofilm formation has been increasingly studied in recent years. Plants support a diverse array of bacteria on or in their roots, transport vessels, stems, and leaves. These plant-associated bacteria have important effects on plant health and productivity. Biofilm formation on plants is associated with symbiotic and pathogenic responses, but how plants regulate such associations is unclear. Certain bacteria in biofilm matrices have been found to induce plant growth and to protect plants from phytopathogens (a process termed biocontrol), whereas others are involved in pathogenesis. In this review, we systematically describe the various components and mechanisms involved in bacterial biofilm formation and attachment to plant surfaces and the relationships of these mechanisms to bacterial activity and survival. View Full-Text
Keywords: biofilms; autoaggregation; plant-associated bacteria; bacterial surface compounds; bacterial exopolymeric compounds biofilms; autoaggregation; plant-associated bacteria; bacterial surface compounds; bacterial exopolymeric compounds
MDPI and ACS Style

Bogino, P.C.; Oliva, M.D.M.; Sorroche, F.G.; Giordano, W. The Role of Bacterial Biofilms and Surface Components in Plant-Bacterial Associations. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2013, 14, 15838-15859.

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