Next Article in Journal
The Effect of Nanoparticles on the Structure and Enzymatic Activity of Human Carbonic Anhydrase I and II
Previous Article in Journal
Clonal Variation in the Bark Chemical Properties of Hybrid Aspen: Potential for Added Value Chemicals
Previous Article in Special Issue
Bichromatic Photoassociation Spectroscopy for the Determination of Rotational Constants of Cs2 0 u + Long-Range State below the 6S1/2 + 6P1/2 Asymptote
Open AccessArticle

Molecular Recalcitrance of Hair Passing the Digestive System of a Canid

1
Institute of Physics and Materials Science, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Peter Jordan Straße 82, 1190 Vienna, Austria
2
Institute of Wildlife Biology and Game Management, University of Natural Resources and Life Sciences, Gregor Mendel Straße 33, 1180 Vienna, Austria
3
Institute of Environmental Sciences and Nature Conservation, Kaposvár University, P.O. Box 16, 7400 Kaposvár, Hungary
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Christian G. Parigger and Robert Splinter
Molecules 2020, 25(19), 4404; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25194404
Received: 26 August 2020 / Revised: 23 September 2020 / Accepted: 23 September 2020 / Published: 25 September 2020
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Practical Applications of Molecular Spectroscopy)
Hair is an important component in scat that is commonly used for prey analyses in carnivores. Chemically, hair predominately consists of keratin. The recalcitrant fiber protein is degraded in nature only by a few insects and soil microorganisms. Common proteases such as pepsin do not decompose keratin. Infrared spectroscopy was used to detect chemical differences caused by pretreatment and fate of hairs. Three sample sets were compared: original untreated hair, original milled hair, and hairs extracted from scats of golden jackals (Canis aureus L.). The results revealed that only milling affected the infrared spectral pattern, whereas digestion had no impact. Moreover, hairs from different species (e.g., boar) could be distinguished due to their spectral characteristics. They did not change through the passage of the digestive system. View Full-Text
Keywords: golden jackal (Canis aureus L.); animal hairs; scat analyses; FTIR spectroscopy golden jackal (Canis aureus L.); animal hairs; scat analyses; FTIR spectroscopy
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Tintner, J.; Hatlauf, J.; Weber, H.; Lanszki, J. Molecular Recalcitrance of Hair Passing the Digestive System of a Canid. Molecules 2020, 25, 4404. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25194404

AMA Style

Tintner J, Hatlauf J, Weber H, Lanszki J. Molecular Recalcitrance of Hair Passing the Digestive System of a Canid. Molecules. 2020; 25(19):4404. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25194404

Chicago/Turabian Style

Tintner, Johannes; Hatlauf, Jennifer; Weber, Heidi; Lanszki, József. 2020. "Molecular Recalcitrance of Hair Passing the Digestive System of a Canid" Molecules 25, no. 19: 4404. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules25194404

Find Other Styles
Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Search more from Scilit
 
Search
Back to TopTop