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Perspective on the Therapeutics of Anti-Snake Venom

1
Ophidism-Scorpionism Program, Faculty of Pharmaceutical and Food Sciences, University of Antioquia UdeA, Medellín 1226, Colombia
2
Analytical Department, Cambrex Pharmaceuticals, Charles City, IA 50616, USA
3
Research group in Pharmacy Regency Technology, Faculty of Pharmaceutical and Food Sciences University of Antioquia UdeA, Medellín 1226, Colombia
4
College of Pharmacy, University of Florida, Gainesville, FL 32610, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Molecules 2019, 24(18), 3276; https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24183276
Received: 11 August 2019 / Revised: 4 September 2019 / Accepted: 6 September 2019 / Published: 9 September 2019
(This article belongs to the Section Natural Products Chemistry)
Snakebite envenomation is a life-threatening disease that was recently re-included as a neglected tropical disease (NTD), affecting millions of people in tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Improvement in the therapeutic approaches to envenomation is required to palliate the morbidity and mortality effects of this NTD. The specific therapeutic treatment for this NTD uses snake antivenom immunoglobulins. Unfortunately, access to these vital drugs is limited, principally due to their cost. Different ethnic groups in the affected regions have achieved notable success in treatment for centuries using natural sources, especially plants, to mitigate the effects of snake envenomation. The ethnopharmacological approach is essential to identify the potential metabolites or derivatives needed to treat this important NTD. Here, the authors describe specific therapeutic snakebite envenomation treatments and conduct a review on different strategies to identify the potential agents that can mitigate the effects of the venoms. The study also covers an increased number of literature reports on the ability of natural sources, particularly plants, to treat snakebites, along with their mechanisms, drawbacks and future perspectives. View Full-Text
Keywords: Anti-venom; medicinal plants; plant constituents; snakebite treatment; snake venom Anti-venom; medicinal plants; plant constituents; snakebite treatment; snake venom
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MDPI and ACS Style

Gómez-Betancur, I.; Gogineni, V.; Salazar-Ospina, A.; León, F. Perspective on the Therapeutics of Anti-Snake Venom. Molecules 2019, 24, 3276. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24183276

AMA Style

Gómez-Betancur I, Gogineni V, Salazar-Ospina A, León F. Perspective on the Therapeutics of Anti-Snake Venom. Molecules. 2019; 24(18):3276. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24183276

Chicago/Turabian Style

Gómez-Betancur, Isabel; Gogineni, Vedanjali; Salazar-Ospina, Andrea; León, Francisco. 2019. "Perspective on the Therapeutics of Anti-Snake Venom" Molecules 24, no. 18: 3276. https://doi.org/10.3390/molecules24183276

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