Next Article in Journal
Clostridioides difficile Infection Rates after Ceftolozane–Tazobactam and Ceftazidime–Avibactam Treatment Compared to Carbapenem Treatment: A Retrospective Single-Center Study
Previous Article in Journal
Clinical Failure and Emergence of Resistance during Third Generation Cephalosporin Therapy for Enterobacter spp. Infection: Is the Risk Overestimated? A Prospective Multicentric Study
Review

SARS–CoV–2 and Food—How Confident Are We about Them?

1
Laboratory of Hygiene of Food of Animal Origin-Veterinary Public Health, School of Veterinary Medicine, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
2
Microbiology Department, Faculty of Medicine, School of Health Sciences, University of Ioannina, 45110 Ioannina, Greece
3
Laboratory of Hygiene and Environmental Protection, Medical School, Democritus University of Thrace, 68100 Alexandroupolis, Greece
4
Department of Microbiology, Medical School, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, 54124 Thessaloniki, Greece
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Fernando Pérez-Rodríguez
Hygiene 2021, 1(3), 80-98; https://doi.org/10.3390/hygiene1030008
Received: 6 September 2021 / Revised: 16 September 2021 / Accepted: 21 September 2021 / Published: 29 September 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Food Hygiene and Safety)
The recent COVID-19 pandemic and coronaviruses have been thrust into the lives of humans around the globe. Several concerns of the scientific community, authorities and common people have been aroused concerning the prophylaxis measures that need to be taken in order to safeguard public health. Among others, the possibility of a faecal—oral route, and consequent waterborne or foodborne transmission, have been given little attention. Ground zero was the seafood market of Huanan in Wuhan, China; therefore, it was quite logical at the time to assume a certain degree of relationship between water, seafood and SARS–CoV–2. In this manuscript, a critical review of the current literature concerning these routes of transmission is made. The main questions discussed are whether (i) SARS–CoV–2 can infect food animals, (ii) it can be detected in water, retaining its infectivity for the necessary amount of time, (iii) there is a possibility of contamination of food by SARS–CoV–2 through its various production processes and (iv) there is evidence of foodborne or waterborne transmission. View Full-Text
Keywords: COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; food; seafood; water; transmission COVID-19; SARS-CoV-2; food; seafood; water; transmission
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Economou, V.; Sakkas, H.; Bezirtzoglou, E.; Papa, A.; Soultos, N. SARS–CoV–2 and Food—How Confident Are We about Them? Hygiene 2021, 1, 80-98. https://doi.org/10.3390/hygiene1030008

AMA Style

Economou V, Sakkas H, Bezirtzoglou E, Papa A, Soultos N. SARS–CoV–2 and Food—How Confident Are We about Them? Hygiene. 2021; 1(3):80-98. https://doi.org/10.3390/hygiene1030008

Chicago/Turabian Style

Economou, Vangelis, Hercules Sakkas, Eugenia Bezirtzoglou, Anna Papa, and Nikolaos Soultos. 2021. "SARS–CoV–2 and Food—How Confident Are We about Them?" Hygiene 1, no. 3: 80-98. https://doi.org/10.3390/hygiene1030008

Find Other Styles

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop