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Article

Measuring Odor Transport of Narcotic Substances Using DART-MS

1
Department of Medical Laboratory Sciences, Faculty of Applied Medical Sciences, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia
2
King Fahd Medical Research Center, King Abdulaziz University, Jeddah 21589, Saudi Arabia
3
International Forensic Research Institute, Florida International University, 11200 SW 8th St., Miami, FL 33199, USA
4
Department of Forensic Science, Virginia Commonwealth University, 1015 Floyd Avenue, Room 2015, Richmond, VA 23284, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Francisca Alves Cardoso, Ricardo Dinis-Oliveira and Pier Matteo Barone
Forensic Sci. 2022, 2(1), 262-271; https://doi.org/10.3390/forensicsci2010020
Received: 14 February 2022 / Revised: 6 March 2022 / Accepted: 9 March 2022 / Published: 13 March 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Feature Papers in Forensic Sciences in 2022)
The employment of canines in matters of law enforcement is due to their heightened olfactory senses, which helps in evaluating the presence of illicit substances. However, there have been instances where canines are signaling the presence of narcotics when they are not there. This study aimed to analyze how active odorants transport from one area to another. Direct Analysis in Real-Time coupled to a high-resolution mass spectrometer (DART-MS) was used to analyze, in real-time, the volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of two narcotic substances: cocaine and methamphetamine. This study found that the transfer of VOCs from these narcotics does occur. Methyl benzoate was detected at 39.3 ± 3.2 s after exposure from 3 meters away, whereas benzaldehyde was detected at 43.3 ± 0.6 s from the same distance. The guidelines used for canine certification should be revisited to account for these results to lower or eliminate unconfirmed alerts by canines. View Full-Text
Keywords: canine; direct analysis in real time; mass spectrometry; time of flight; methyl benzoate and benzaldehyde canine; direct analysis in real time; mass spectrometry; time of flight; methyl benzoate and benzaldehyde
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zughaibi, T.A.; Furton, K.G.; Holness, H.K.; Peace, M.R. Measuring Odor Transport of Narcotic Substances Using DART-MS. Forensic Sci. 2022, 2, 262-271. https://doi.org/10.3390/forensicsci2010020

AMA Style

Zughaibi TA, Furton KG, Holness HK, Peace MR. Measuring Odor Transport of Narcotic Substances Using DART-MS. Forensic Sciences. 2022; 2(1):262-271. https://doi.org/10.3390/forensicsci2010020

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zughaibi, Torki A., Kenneth G. Furton, Howard K. Holness, and Michelle R. Peace. 2022. "Measuring Odor Transport of Narcotic Substances Using DART-MS" Forensic Sciences 2, no. 1: 262-271. https://doi.org/10.3390/forensicsci2010020

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