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Proceeding Paper

A Social Engagement Fast Track on Energy Communities—Key Lesson Learned from H2020 EU Projects †

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GridAbility, Via Bacco, 5, 09030 Elmas, Cagliari, Italy
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Dune Works, Torenallee 45, 5617 BA Eindhoven, The Netherlands
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European Science Communication Institute, Lindenstrasse 87, 26123 Oldenburg, Germany
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Clúster Digital de Catalunya, Carrer Bilbao, 72, Edif., A, 08018 Barcelona, Spain
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Aalborg University, Fredrik Bajers Vej 7K, 9220 Aalborg Øst, Denmark
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Energieinstitut an der Johannes Kepler Universität Linz, Altenberger Straße 69, 4040 Linz, Austria
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Evergi Research Group, MOBI-VUB, Pleinlaan 2, 1050 Brussel, Belgium
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Deep Blue, Via Manin 53, 00185 Rome, Italy
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Department of Interdisciplinary Studies of Culture, Norwegian University of Science and Technology (NTNU), NO-7491 Trondheim, Norway
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Presented at the Sustainable Places 2021, Rome, Italy, 29 September–1 October 2021.
Academic Editor: Zia Lennard
Environ. Sci. Proc. 2021, 11(1), 17; https://doi.org/10.3390/environsciproc2021011017
Published: 29 November 2021
(This article belongs to the Proceedings of The 9th Annual Edition of Sustainable Places (SP 2021))
Energy communities organise collective and citizen-driven energy actions that will help pave the way for a clean energy transition, while moving citizens to the forefront. The energy market is rapidly transforming and so is the role of the consumer. Yesterday’s passive consumers become central actors in today’s energy markets. Today, as prosumers, citizens can benefit from their generation, consumption, and storage capabilities. Moreover, by supporting social engagement and citizen participation, energy communities can help provide flexibility to the electricity system through demand response, storage, and peer-to-peer energy exchange. Based on the collective debate from nine H2020 running projects (Renaissance, COMETS, Sender, eCREW, Lightness, ReDream, HESTIA, UP-STAIRS and NRG2peers), several challenges and key lessons learned can be identified for just social engagement. These challenges and lessons are relevant for the present and future development of EU energy communities. View Full-Text
Keywords: energy communities; social engagement; citizen empowerment; P2P energy trading energy communities; social engagement; citizen empowerment; P2P energy trading
MDPI and ACS Style

d’Oca, S.; Breukers, S.; Slingerland, S.; Boekelo, M.; van Welie, M.J.; Moscardi, C.; Aggeli, A.; Burgstaller, K.; Coosemans, T.; Hueting, R.; Throndsen, W. A Social Engagement Fast Track on Energy Communities—Key Lesson Learned from H2020 EU Projects. Environ. Sci. Proc. 2021, 11, 17. https://doi.org/10.3390/environsciproc2021011017

AMA Style

d’Oca S, Breukers S, Slingerland S, Boekelo M, van Welie MJ, Moscardi C, Aggeli A, Burgstaller K, Coosemans T, Hueting R, Throndsen W. A Social Engagement Fast Track on Energy Communities—Key Lesson Learned from H2020 EU Projects. Environmental Sciences Proceedings. 2021; 11(1):17. https://doi.org/10.3390/environsciproc2021011017

Chicago/Turabian Style

d’Oca, Simona, Sylvia Breukers, Stephan Slingerland, Marten Boekelo, Mara J. van Welie, Christian Moscardi, Aggeliki Aggeli, Katrin Burgstaller, Thierry Coosemans, Rebecca Hueting, and William Throndsen. 2021. "A Social Engagement Fast Track on Energy Communities—Key Lesson Learned from H2020 EU Projects" Environmental Sciences Proceedings 11, no. 1: 17. https://doi.org/10.3390/environsciproc2021011017

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