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Open AccessArticle

Sedimentary Landscape of Mun Valley Prehistoric Site: Construction History of Moated Site of Ban Non Wat, Northeast Thailand

1
Department of Anthropology, University of Sri Jayewardenepura, Nugegoda 10250, Sri Lanka
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School of Environment, Science and Engineering, Southern Cross University, East Lismore, NSW 2480, Australia
3
College of Arts, Society and Education, James Cook University, Townsville, QLD 4810, Australia
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Dolores R. Piperno and Valentí Rull
Quaternary 2020, 3(1), 3; https://doi.org/10.3390/quat3010003
Received: 22 October 2019 / Revised: 16 December 2019 / Accepted: 16 January 2020 / Published: 20 January 2020
This research examines the sedimentological evidence of human occupation on different cultural layers at the prehistoric archaeological sites in northeast Thailand. This study focuses on the sedimentological characters of stratigraphic layers identified at the prehistoric occupation sites of Ban Non Wat and Nong Hua Raet, to demonstrate the capacity of such analyses to elucidate the modification of sediments by past anthropogenic activity, and eventually to contribute to an enhanced understanding of the behaviour of ancient people. The primary intention of this paper is, therefore, to point out potential uses of particle analysis in identifying human–landscape interventions, testing whether meaningful differentiation is possible, and if not, whether this may nevertheless be used to understand the sedimentological relationships between different features. The study finds that although there is relatively little differentiation between sediments across the archaeological site, some insight is possible in identifying relationships between the natural sediments of the floodplain, the channels associated with the archaeological sites, and the archaeological sediments themselves. It is, for example, now possible to raise new questions regarding the construction history of the sites, the history of human behaviour at these sites, socio-spatial relationships between paleo-social activity and natural resources, and fine-scale landscape associations between sites. View Full-Text
Keywords: northeast Thailand; prehistoric settlement; sedimentology; anthropogenic sediments; Mastersizer northeast Thailand; prehistoric settlement; sedimentology; anthropogenic sediments; Mastersizer
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Kanthilatha, N.; Boyd, W.; Chang, N. Sedimentary Landscape of Mun Valley Prehistoric Site: Construction History of Moated Site of Ban Non Wat, Northeast Thailand. Quaternary 2020, 3, 3.

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