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Review

A Contemporary Exploration of Traditional Indian Snake Envenomation Therapies

1
Sinhgad Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, 309/310, Kusgaon (BK), Lonavala 410401, India
2
Alliance Institute of Advanced Pharmaceutical & Health Sciences, Patel Nagar, Kukatpally, Hyderabad 500085, India
3
Arogyalabh Foundation, Bibvewadi, Pune 411037, India
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Koert Ritmeijer and Vyacheslav Yurchenko
Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2022, 7(6), 108; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed7060108
Received: 16 May 2022 / Revised: 8 June 2022 / Accepted: 14 June 2022 / Published: 16 June 2022
(This article belongs to the Section Neglected and Emerging Tropical Diseases)
Snakebite being a quick progressing serious situation needs immediate and aggressive therapy. Snake venom antiserum is the only approved and effective treatment available, but for selected snake species only. The requirement of trained staff for administration and serum reactions make the therapy complicated. In tropical countries where snakebite incidence is high and healthcare facilities are limited, mortality and morbidities associated with snake envenomation are proportionately high. Traditional compilations of medical practitioners’ personal journals have wealth of plant-based snake venom antidotes. Relatively, very few plants or their extractives have been scientifically investigated for neutralization of snake venom or its components. None of these investigations presents enough evidence to initiate clinical testing of the agents. This review focuses on curating Indian traditional snake envenomation therapies, identifying plants involved and finding relevant evidence across modern literature to neutralize snake venom components. Traditional formulations, their method of preparation and dosing have been discussed along with the investigational approach in modern research and their possible outcomes. A safe and easily administrable small molecule of plant origin that would protect or limit the spread of venom and provide valuable time for the victim to reach the healthcare centre would be a great lifesaver. View Full-Text
Keywords: snake envenomation; neglected tropical disease; plant-based antidote; traditional therapies; Naja naja; Daboia russelii; life saver snake envenomation; neglected tropical disease; plant-based antidote; traditional therapies; Naja naja; Daboia russelii; life saver
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MDPI and ACS Style

Deshpande, A.M.; Sastry, K.V.; Bhise, S.B. A Contemporary Exploration of Traditional Indian Snake Envenomation Therapies. Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2022, 7, 108. https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed7060108

AMA Style

Deshpande AM, Sastry KV, Bhise SB. A Contemporary Exploration of Traditional Indian Snake Envenomation Therapies. Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease. 2022; 7(6):108. https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed7060108

Chicago/Turabian Style

Deshpande, Adwait M., K. Venkata Sastry, and Satish B. Bhise. 2022. "A Contemporary Exploration of Traditional Indian Snake Envenomation Therapies" Tropical Medicine and Infectious Disease 7, no. 6: 108. https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed7060108

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