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Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2019, 4(1), 15; https://doi.org/10.3390/tropicalmed4010015

Use of Geospatial Surveillance and Response Systems for Vector-Borne Diseases in the Elimination Phase

1
Pathobiological Sciences, School of Veterinary Medicine, Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA 70803, USA
2
Ingerod, SE-454 94 Brastad, Sweden
3
National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA), MSFC ST11, NSSTC, 320 Sparkman Drive, Huntsville, AL 35805, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 28 December 2018 / Revised: 14 January 2019 / Accepted: 15 January 2019 / Published: 18 January 2019
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Prospects for Schistosomiasis Elimination)
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Abstract

The distribution of diseases caused by vector-borne viruses and parasites are restricted by the environmental requirements of their vectors, but also by the ambient temperature inside the host as it influences the speed of maturation of the infectious agent transferred. The launch of the Soil Moisture Active Passive (SMAP) satellite in 2015, and the new ECOSTRESS instrument onboard the International Space Station (ISS) in 2018, established the leadership of the National Aeronautics Space Administration (NASA) in ecology and climate research by allowing the structural and functional classification of ecosystems that govern vector sustainability. These advances, and the availability of sub-meter resolution data from commercial satellites, contribute to seamless mapping and modelling of diseases, not only at continental scales (1 km2) and local community or agricultural field scales (15–30 m2), but for the first time, also at the habitat–household scale (<1 m2). This communication presents current capabilities that are related to data collection by Earth-observing satellites, and draws attention to the usefulness of geographical information systems (GIS) and modelling for the study of important parasitic diseases. View Full-Text
Keywords: GIS; remote-sensing; satellite; international space station; ECOSTRESS; worldview; spatio-temporal epidemiology; climate change; parasite; schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis GIS; remote-sensing; satellite; international space station; ECOSTRESS; worldview; spatio-temporal epidemiology; climate change; parasite; schistosomiasis, leishmaniasis
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Malone, J.B.; Bergquist, R.; Martins, M.; Luvall, J.C. Use of Geospatial Surveillance and Response Systems for Vector-Borne Diseases in the Elimination Phase. Trop. Med. Infect. Dis. 2019, 4, 15.

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