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Open AccessArticle

School-Based Intervention on Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Brazilian Students: A Nonrandomized Controlled Trial

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Research Centre in Physical Activity and Health, School of Sports, Department of Physical Education Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário – Trindade, Florianópolis, SC 88040-900, Brazil
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Research Centre for Kineantropometry and Human Performan, School of Sports, Department of Physical Education Federal University of Santa Catarina, Campus Universitário - Trindade. Florianópolis, SC 88040-900, Brazil
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School of Life Sciences, Faculty of Health and Life Sciences, Coventry University. James Starley Building, Priory Street, Coventry, CV1 5FB, UK
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Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2019, 4(1), 10; https://doi.org/10.3390/jfmk4010010
Received: 19 December 2018 / Revised: 10 January 2019 / Accepted: 17 January 2019 / Published: 21 January 2019
Background: In response to the worldwide increasing prevalence of low cardiorespiratory fitness (CRF), several interventions have been developed. The aim of this study was to examine the effect of a school-based intervention on CRF in Brazilian students. Methods: A nonrandomised controlled design tested 432 students (intervention group: n = 247) from 6th to 9th grade recruited from two public secondary schools in Florianopolis, in 2015. The intervention entitled “MEXA-SE” (move yourself), applied over 13 weeks, included four components: (1) increases in physical activity during Physical Education classes; (2) active recess; (3) educational sessions; and (4) educational materials. CRF (20-m shuttle run test) was the primary outcome. Results: The effect size of the intervention on CRF was 0.15 (CI 95% = –0.04; 0.34). In the within-group comparisons, VO2max decreased significantly from baseline to follow-up in the control group but remained constant in the intervention group. After adjustment variables, differences between intervention and control group were not statistically significant (p > 0.05). Conclusion: The “MEXA-SE” intervention did not have an effect on adolescents’ CRF. However, maintenance of VO2max in intervention group and a reduction within control group demonstrates that this intervention may be beneficial for long-term CRF and, possibly, the increased intervention time could result in a better effect. View Full-Text
Keywords: physical fitness; children; adolescents; intervention study; physical education; school health; motor activity physical fitness; children; adolescents; intervention study; physical education; school health; motor activity
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Minatto, G.; Petroski, E.L.; Silva, K.S.; Duncan, M.J. School-Based Intervention on Cardiorespiratory Fitness in Brazilian Students: A Nonrandomized Controlled Trial. J. Funct. Morphol. Kinesiol. 2019, 4, 10.

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