Next Article in Journal
Hospitalization of Transgender Youth in a Psychiatric Ward—Opportunities and Challenges: A Case Study
Previous Article in Journal
Women Trading Sex in a U.S.-Mexico Border City: A Qualitative Study of the Barriers and Facilitators to Finding Community and Voice
Article

Sex Differences in the Association between Household Income and Children’s Executive Function

1
Department of Family Medicine, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, CA 90059, USA
2
Department of Pediatrics, Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science, Los Angeles, CA 90059, USA
3
Department of Family Medicine, University of California Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, CA 90095, USA
4
Department of Health Behaviors and Health Education, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Sexes 2020, 1(1), 19-31; https://doi.org/10.3390/sexes1010002
Received: 11 August 2020 / Revised: 12 October 2020 / Accepted: 15 October 2020 / Published: 19 October 2020
The study aimed to investigate sex differences in the boosting effects of household income on children’s executive function in the US. This is a cross-sectional study using data from Wave 1 of the Adolescent Brain Cognitive Development (ABCD) study. Wave 1 ABCD included 8608 American children between ages 9 and 10 years old. The independent variable was household income. The primary outcome was executive function measured by the stop-signal task. Overall, high household income was associated with higher levels of executive function in the children. Sex showed a statistically significant interaction with household income on children’s executive function, indicating a stronger effect of high household income for female compared to male children. Household income is a more salient determinant of executive function for female compared to male American children. Low-income female children remain at the highest risk regarding poor executive function. View Full-Text
Keywords: executive function; socioeconomic status; children; household income executive function; socioeconomic status; children; household income
Show Figures

Figure 1

MDPI and ACS Style

Assari, S.; Boyce, S.; Bazargan, M.; Caldwell, C.H. Sex Differences in the Association between Household Income and Children’s Executive Function. Sexes 2020, 1, 19-31. https://doi.org/10.3390/sexes1010002

AMA Style

Assari S, Boyce S, Bazargan M, Caldwell CH. Sex Differences in the Association between Household Income and Children’s Executive Function. Sexes. 2020; 1(1):19-31. https://doi.org/10.3390/sexes1010002

Chicago/Turabian Style

Assari, Shervin, Shanika Boyce, Mohsen Bazargan, and Cleopatra H. Caldwell 2020. "Sex Differences in the Association between Household Income and Children’s Executive Function" Sexes 1, no. 1: 19-31. https://doi.org/10.3390/sexes1010002

Find Other Styles

Article Access Map by Country/Region

1
Back to TopTop