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Bioelectrical Impedance Versus Biochemical Analysis of Hydration Status: Predictive Value for Prolonged Hospitalisation and Poor Discharge Destination for Older Patients

1
Ageing Clinical & Experimental Research Team, Institute of Applied Health Sciences, University of Aberdeen, Aberdeen AB24 3FX, UK
2
Department of Nutrition & Dietetics, Birzeit University, Birzeit P.O. Box 14, Palestine
3
Department of Medicine for the Elderly, Aberdeen Royal Infirmary, NHS Grampian, Aberdeen AB25 2ZN, UK
4
Norwich Medical School, University of East Anglia, Norwich NR4 7TJ, UK
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Alessandro Sartorio
Healthcare 2021, 9(2), 154; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020154
Received: 3 January 2021 / Revised: 1 February 2021 / Accepted: 1 February 2021 / Published: 3 February 2021
(This article belongs to the Section Health Assessments)
Dehydration is prevalent in hospitalised patients and is associated with increased morbidity and mortality, particularly among the elderly (≥65 years). We aimed at comparing the performance of intracellular water to extracellular water ratio (ICW/ECW), calculated through a bioelectrical impedance analysis (BIA) of blood urea nitrogen, with the creatinine ratio (BUN/Cr) to predict poor outcomes in a cohort of prospectively identified patients. Data were combined from a cohort of elderly patients (≥65 years) admitted to hospital with fragility fracture (n = 125) and older adults aged ≥50 years admitted to hospital with stroke (n = 40). The association between hydration status and study outcomes (unfavourable discharge destination (rehabilitation, another ward, or death) and prolonged hospitalisation (>10 days)) was examined using logistic regression. The overall diagnostic accuracy of each hydration status measurement was assessed using the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve. In 165 participants (mean age (SD) of 76.7 (9.2) years), an ICW/ECW ratio below the 25th percentile was associated with increased odds of poor discharge destination (OR (95% CI) = 4.25 (1.59–11.34)). Neither the relationship between the BUN/Cr ratio and prolonged stay nor discharge destination was significant. A BIA could be used utilised in conjunction with biochemical measurements to inform patient prognosis. View Full-Text
Keywords: dehydration; bioelectrical impedance; intracellular; extracellular; blood urea nitrogen; creatinine dehydration; bioelectrical impedance; intracellular; extracellular; blood urea nitrogen; creatinine
MDPI and ACS Style

Wood, A.D.; Edward, G.D.; Cumming, K.; Kafri, M.W.; Soiza, R.L.; Hooper, L.; Potter, J.F.; Myint, P.K. Bioelectrical Impedance Versus Biochemical Analysis of Hydration Status: Predictive Value for Prolonged Hospitalisation and Poor Discharge Destination for Older Patients. Healthcare 2021, 9, 154. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020154

AMA Style

Wood AD, Edward GD, Cumming K, Kafri MW, Soiza RL, Hooper L, Potter JF, Myint PK. Bioelectrical Impedance Versus Biochemical Analysis of Hydration Status: Predictive Value for Prolonged Hospitalisation and Poor Discharge Destination for Older Patients. Healthcare. 2021; 9(2):154. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020154

Chicago/Turabian Style

Wood, Adrian D., Gillian D. Edward, Kirsten Cumming, Mohannad W. Kafri, Roy L. Soiza, Lee Hooper, John F. Potter, and Phyo K. Myint. 2021. "Bioelectrical Impedance Versus Biochemical Analysis of Hydration Status: Predictive Value for Prolonged Hospitalisation and Poor Discharge Destination for Older Patients" Healthcare 9, no. 2: 154. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9020154

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