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Open AccessArticle

Are Your Vitals OK? Revitalizing Vitality of Nurses through Relational Caring for Patients

1
Sogang Business School, Sogang University, 35 Baekbeom-ro, Mapo-gu, Seoul 04107, Korea
2
Department of Management and Organization, National University of Singapore Business School, National University of Singapore, 15 Kent Ridge Drive, Singapore 119245, Singapore
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Healthcare 2021, 9(1), 46; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9010046
Received: 12 December 2020 / Revised: 30 December 2020 / Accepted: 30 December 2020 / Published: 5 January 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Burnout, Perceived Efficacy, Compassion Fatigue and Job Satisfaction)
This study offers an alternative approach to address on-going concerns about burnout of healthcare employees. Departing from the existing job-demand based approach proposing that healthcare employees’ burnout can be resolved by reducing demands, we theorize that patient-centered prosocial behavior, even if it often increases job demands, could serve as potential job resources that fuel positive energy to vitalize nurses at work. We further theorize that this possibility could be more pronounced among a group of nurses with a strong sense of ethical membership regarding their hospital (i.e., moral identification). To test our hypotheses, we used a sample of 202 nurses from 104 South Korean hospitals. We found that, even controlling for workloads as an indicator of job demand, nurses who engage in patient-centered prosocial behavior (i.e., relational caring) are likely to feel vitalized, and this pattern is more salient among a group of nurses with high moral identification. Results indicate that prosocial behavior could be an alternative job resource that helps nurses flourish at work. View Full-Text
Keywords: healthcare employees; relational caring; vitality; moral identification healthcare employees; relational caring; vitality; moral identification
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MDPI and ACS Style

Park, J.H.; Chang, Y.K.; Kim, S. Are Your Vitals OK? Revitalizing Vitality of Nurses through Relational Caring for Patients. Healthcare 2021, 9, 46. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9010046

AMA Style

Park JH, Chang YK, Kim S. Are Your Vitals OK? Revitalizing Vitality of Nurses through Relational Caring for Patients. Healthcare. 2021; 9(1):46. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9010046

Chicago/Turabian Style

Park, Jung H.; Chang, Young K.; Kim, Sooyeol. 2021. "Are Your Vitals OK? Revitalizing Vitality of Nurses through Relational Caring for Patients" Healthcare 9, no. 1: 46. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare9010046

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