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Subjective Assessment of Head and Facial Appearance in Children with Craniosynostoses after Surgical Treatment

1
Department of Radiotherapy, Maria Skłodowska-Curie Memorial Cancer Center and Institute of Oncology, Gliwice Branch, Wybrzeże AK 15, 44-101 Gliwice, Poland
2
Institute of Sociology, University of Opole, Katowicka 89, 45-061 Opole, Poland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Healthcare 2018, 6(4), 127; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare6040127
Received: 23 August 2018 / Revised: 19 October 2018 / Accepted: 22 October 2018 / Published: 24 October 2018
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Abstract

Background: Craniosynostoses are congenital defects in the construction of the skull involving premature fusion of one or more cranial sutures. Premature fusion of sutures causes characteristic skull deformation(s). This affect the structure and thus the appearance of the entire head and face. The aim of this study was to analyze parents’ subjective assessments of head and facial appearance in children with craniosynostoses before and after surgery. Parents also assessed the interpersonal relationship of their children with peers and adults (after surgery). Methods: This study was conducted among parents of 230 children treated in Poland, in two multidisciplinary centers. Detailed statistical analysis was conducted among children who had undergone surgery. Independent variables were age (at survey) of the child (three years and less, four years, and five years and more) and type of craniosynostosis (isolated and syndromic). A chi-square independence test was used. Data was collected using surveys. Results: In the opinion of most parents, the appearance of their child’s head and face after surgery did not differ or differed only slightly from that of their peers. The results of subjective assessment of appearance of children’s face and head after reconstructive treatment remains comparable in three subgroups of patients according to the age. It seems that specific head shape according to the type of craniosynostosis does not have an impact on relations with peers and adults. Conclusion: Surgical treatment of children with craniosynostoses improves the appearance of their head and face. This improvement seems not to depend on the type of isolated craniosynostosis, and is constant over time. View Full-Text
Keywords: craniosinostosis; results of surgery; craniofacial disfigurement; clinical survey; subjective assessment; surgical outcomes craniosinostosis; results of surgery; craniofacial disfigurement; clinical survey; subjective assessment; surgical outcomes
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Larysz, D.; Nieroba, E. Subjective Assessment of Head and Facial Appearance in Children with Craniosynostoses after Surgical Treatment. Healthcare 2018, 6, 127.

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