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Medicaid Expansions: Probing Medicaid’s Filling of the Cancer Genetic Testing and Screening Space

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Epidemiology, Center for Public Health and Community Genomics, School of Public Health, University of Michigan, M5409 SPH II, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109, USA
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Public Policy, FORCE: Facing Our Risk of Cancer Empowered, 16057 Tampa Palms Boulevard W, PMB #373, Tampa, FL 33647, USA
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Department of Public Health Sciences, College of Medicine, Medical University of South Carolina, 22 Westedge, Room 213, Charleston, SC 29403, USA
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Genetics and Newborn Screening Unit, North Carolina Department of Health and Human Services, C/O CDSA of the Cape Fear, 3311 Burnt Mill Drive, Wilmington, NC 28403, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editors: Christopher R. Cogle and Edward J. Pavlik
Healthcare 2022, 10(6), 1066; https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10061066
Received: 1 April 2022 / Revised: 25 May 2022 / Accepted: 5 June 2022 / Published: 8 June 2022
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Medicaid and Public Health)
Cancer is the third largest source of spending for Medicaid in the United States. A working group of the American Public Health Association Genomics Forum Policy Committee reviewed 133/149 pieces of literature addressing the impact of Medicaid expansion on cancer screening and genetic testing in underserved groups and the general population. Breast and colorectal cancer screening rates improved during very early Medicaid expansion but displayed mixed improvement thereafter. Breast cancer screening rates have remained steady for Latina Medicaid enrollees; colorectal cancer screening rates have improved for African Americans. Urban areas have benefited more than rural. State programs increasingly cover BRCA1/2 and Lynch syndrome genetic testing, though testing remains underutilized in racial and ethnic groups. While increased federal matching could incentivize more states to engage in Medicaid expansion, steps need to be taken to ensure that they have an adequate distribution of resources to increase screening and testing utilization. View Full-Text
Keywords: Medicaid; African Americans; Latinos; rural population; breast cancer; colorectal cancer; cancer screening; genetic testing Medicaid; African Americans; Latinos; rural population; breast cancer; colorectal cancer; cancer screening; genetic testing
MDPI and ACS Style

Modell, S.M.; Schlager, L.; Allen, C.G.; Marcus, G. Medicaid Expansions: Probing Medicaid’s Filling of the Cancer Genetic Testing and Screening Space. Healthcare 2022, 10, 1066. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10061066

AMA Style

Modell SM, Schlager L, Allen CG, Marcus G. Medicaid Expansions: Probing Medicaid’s Filling of the Cancer Genetic Testing and Screening Space. Healthcare. 2022; 10(6):1066. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10061066

Chicago/Turabian Style

Modell, Stephen M., Lisa Schlager, Caitlin G. Allen, and Gail Marcus. 2022. "Medicaid Expansions: Probing Medicaid’s Filling of the Cancer Genetic Testing and Screening Space" Healthcare 10, no. 6: 1066. https://doi.org/10.3390/healthcare10061066

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Note that from the first issue of 2016, MDPI journals use article numbers instead of page numbers. See further details here.

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