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Open AccessArticle

Risks of Stigmatisation Resulting from Assistive Technologies for Persons with Autism Spectrum Disorder

1
Marie Curie ASSISTID Fellow, Institute of Ethics, School of Theology, Philosophy & Music, Dublin City University, Dublin 9, Ireland
2
Institute of Ethics, School of Theology, Philosophy & Music, Dublin City University, Dublin 9, Ireland
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
This paper is an extended version of our paper published in AAATE2017 Congress Proceedings, Sheffield, UK, 13–14 September 2017, with permission from IOS Press.
Technologies 2018, 6(1), 27; https://doi.org/10.3390/technologies6010027
Received: 27 December 2017 / Revised: 12 February 2018 / Accepted: 18 February 2018 / Published: 26 February 2018
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Selected Papers from AAATE2017 Congress)
Assistive technologies (ATs) are currently being developed for cohorts of vulnerable people, including persons with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This paper focuses on the risks that the development of ATs for persons with ASD might lead to increased risks of stigmatisation. Firstly, we assess the ways in which the use of ATs might result in the stigmatisation of users, alongside the corollary question of risks associated with a refusal to use ATs in the event of their being socially expected. Secondly, we focus on the question of whether the “project” of developing ATs for persons with ASD is itself stigmatising, and whether the “project” risks stigmatising persons with ASD by offering “cures”. View Full-Text
Keywords: Ethics; Assistive Technology; Autism; Stigmatisation; expressivist objection; social model; medical model Ethics; Assistive Technology; Autism; Stigmatisation; expressivist objection; social model; medical model
MDPI and ACS Style

O’Brolcháin, F.; Gordijn, B. Risks of Stigmatisation Resulting from Assistive Technologies for Persons with Autism Spectrum Disorder. Technologies 2018, 6, 27.

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