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Article

A Generalist Feeding on Brassicaceae: It Does Not Get Any Better with Selection

1
Centre for Planetary Health and Food Security, Griffith University, Brisbane 4011, Australia
2
Max Planck Institute for Chemical Ecology, 07745 Jena, Germany
3
School of Biological Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane 4072, Australia
4
Institute of Bioinformatics and Biotechnology, Savitribai Phule Pune University, Pune 411007, India
*
Authors to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Academic Editor: Michael J. Stout
Plants 2021, 10(5), 954; https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10050954
Received: 8 April 2021 / Revised: 21 April 2021 / Accepted: 5 May 2021 / Published: 11 May 2021
(This article belongs to the Special Issue Plant–Insect Interactions)
Brassicaceae (Cruciferae) are ostensibly defended in part against generalist insect herbivores by toxic isothiocyanates formed when protoxic glucosinolates are hydrolysed. Based on an analysis of published host records, feeding on Brassicas is widespread by both specialist and generalists in the Lepidoptera. The polyphagous noctuid moth Helicoverpa armigera is recorded as a pest on some Brassicas and we attempted to improve performance by artificial selection to, in part, determine if this contributes to pest status. Assays on cabbage and kale versus an artificial diet showed no difference in larval growth rate, development times and pupal weights between the parental and the selected strain after 2, 21 and 29 rounds of selection, nor in behaviour assays after 50 generations. There were large differences between the two Brassicas: performance was better on kale than cabbage, although both were comparable to records for other crop hosts, on which the species is a major pest. We discuss what determines “pest” status. View Full-Text
Keywords: glucosinolates; host specialisation; forced selection; performance assays; pest status glucosinolates; host specialisation; forced selection; performance assays; pest status
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MDPI and ACS Style

Zalucki, J.M.; Heckel, D.G.; Wang, P.; Kuwar, S.; Vassão, D.G.; Perkins, L.; Zalucki, M.P. A Generalist Feeding on Brassicaceae: It Does Not Get Any Better with Selection. Plants 2021, 10, 954. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10050954

AMA Style

Zalucki JM, Heckel DG, Wang P, Kuwar S, Vassão DG, Perkins L, Zalucki MP. A Generalist Feeding on Brassicaceae: It Does Not Get Any Better with Selection. Plants. 2021; 10(5):954. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10050954

Chicago/Turabian Style

Zalucki, Jacinta M., David G. Heckel, Peng Wang, Suyog Kuwar, Daniel G. Vassão, Lynda Perkins, and Myron P. Zalucki. 2021. "A Generalist Feeding on Brassicaceae: It Does Not Get Any Better with Selection" Plants 10, no. 5: 954. https://doi.org/10.3390/plants10050954

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