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Religions 2018, 9(11), 328; https://doi.org/10.3390/rel9110328

Are Religious Teens Nice Kids? Faith and Congeniality among American Adolescents

1
Department of Sociology and Anthropology, Marshall University, Huntington, WV 25755, USA
2
Department of Sociology, University of Texas at San Antonio, San Antonio, TX 78249, USA
3
The School of Public Administration, Sichuan University, Chengdu 610064, China
4
Department of Sociology, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152, USA
*
Author to whom correspondence should be addressed.
Received: 19 September 2018 / Revised: 22 October 2018 / Accepted: 23 October 2018 / Published: 26 October 2018
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Abstract

One body of extant research has documented the social contours and positive effects of teen religiosity, while another has explored the religious sources of social congeniality (“niceness”) among adult Americans. This study integrates these parallel bodies of scholarship by examining the religious bases of niceness among American teens. Using post-hoc interviewer ratings from wave 1 of the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health (Add Health), we examine the degree to which religious teens are perceived more positively than their nonreligious peers. Associations linked to six dimensions of teen religiosity are considered. Select facets of teen religiosity are associated with more positive interviewer ratings, particularly for interpersonal warmth, thereby providing modest support for hypothesized patterns. Findings are interpreted in light of current theories of religious involvement, interpersonal dispositions, and social competencies. View Full-Text
Keywords: adolescents; teens; congeniality; social competence; religion; Add Health adolescents; teens; congeniality; social competence; religion; Add Health
This is an open access article distributed under the Creative Commons Attribution License which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided the original work is properly cited (CC BY 4.0).
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Fondren, K.M.; Bartkowski, J.P.; Xu, X.; Levin, M.L. Are Religious Teens Nice Kids? Faith and Congeniality among American Adolescents. Religions 2018, 9, 328.

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